News

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Published Aug. 4, 2020 10:04 AM

Despite increased information and knowledge, racism is still alive and kicking around the world. New research suggests racism could be a genetic trait.

In the times of corona: people keeping their distance in the park.
Published Apr. 28, 2020 3:40 PM

"The quality of life in Norway is already unequally distributed. And the marginalized groups are going to increase in the wake of the Corona pandemic," says Ragnhild Bang Nes. She has conducted research into what makes us happy.

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Published Oct. 29, 2019 3:58 PM

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are highly hereditary diseases. But is it possible to predict who will get them? That is one of the aims of Associate Professor Lars Tjelta Westlye, who is now to receive the Anders Jahre Prize for Young Scientists.

Published May 3, 2018 2:36 PM

Damaging your body may be a way to control negative emotions. New research from UiO shows that young people also use self-harm to communicate and share difficult feelings, which they are unable to express in words.

Published Nov. 4, 2015 2:35 PM

Few visual impressions can be compared to humans’ interest for faces. New research suggests that our brain rewards us for looking at pretty faces.

Published June 29, 2015 8:30 AM

The Oslo-based Research Group for Lifespan Changes in Brain and Cognition has been named as a world-class research group. At the same time the group’s founders, Anders Fjell and Kristine Walhovd, have just received the Research Prize for 2015 awarded by the University of Oslo.

People with the serotonin gene variant have a higher risk than others for developing a depression, when faced with stressful life circumstances. Photo illustration: Colourbox
Published June 15, 2015 8:30 AM

People born with a particular gene variant have a greater risk of developing depressions, a recent study from the Department of Psychology shows.

Published Mar. 24, 2015 1:01 PM

A newborn infant can see its parents' expressions at a distance of 30 cm. For the first time researchers have managed to reconstruct infants visual perception of the world.