Keir James Cecil Martin

Associate Professor - Department of Social Anthropology
Image of Keir James Cecil Martin
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Phone +47-22856603
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Visiting address Moltke Moes vei 31 Eilert Sundts hus blokk A 0851 OSLO
Postal address Postboks 1091 Blindern 0317 OSLO

Academic interests

Social stratification, exchange theory, Papua New Guinea, psychotherapy

Courses taught

Background

Keir Martin is Associate Professor in Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo and is the author of a number of academic and media publications on Papua New Guinea and the global economy. He was formerly a Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester and is a recipient of the Royal Anthropological Institute's Sutasoma Award for work likely to make an outstanding contribution to social anthropology.   He is currently working on the growth of psychotherapy among new middle class populations globally and is a practicing member of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

Tags: Papua New Guinea

Publications

Books.

2013. The Death of the Big Men and the Rise of the Big Shots: Custom and Conflict in East New Britain. Berghahn Books.  ‘A fascinating, plainspoken new ethnography… the start of a new Melanesian sociology’, American Anthropologist. ‘A groundbreaking ethnography: brilliantly conceived, clearly written and utterly convincing’, Pacific Affairs.

Edited collections.

Forthcoming. Psychotherapy, Anthropology and the work of Culture. To be published with Karnac Books, December 2018.

2008. Tourism as Social Contest. Special Issue of Tourism, Culture and Communication.

Journal articles.

In Press. Tubuan ritual in Papua New Guinea: the silencing of subaltern perspectives in contemporary anthropological theory. Accepted for publication in Anthropological Theory.

2018. Tolai tabu as wealth and money: a shifting and unstable distinction. History and Anthropology. 29(3):392-406.

2018. Wage-labour and a double separation in Papua New Guinea and beyond. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

2018. Transcultural histories of psychotherapy. European Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy. 20(1):1-16.

2017. Trump; transacting trickster. Anthropology Today. Co-authored with Jakob Krause-Jensen.

2016. Creating and dissolving social groups from New Guinea to New York: on the overheating of bounded corporate entities in contemporary global capitalism. History and Anthropology. 27(4):1-17. Co-authored with Adam Leaver.

2016. Statistics, Sneers and Fears. Social Anthropology. 24(4):494-5.

2015. Taking neoliberalism seriously. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. 21(4):920-923.

2015. Public Anthropology and Anthropological Theory: A zero-sum game?  Anthropology Today. 31(1):12-14. Co-authored with Alex Flynn.

2014. Knot work not networks: or anti-anti-anti fetishism and the ANT-i politics machine. Hau: The Journal of Ethnographic Theory. 4(3):99-115.

2014. Stand-up for anthropology: Comedy and performing knowledge. Suomen Antropologi. 39(4):44-47.

2014. Sovereignty and Freedom in West Papua and beyond. Oceania. 84(3):342-348.

2014. UKIP and the rise of populist politics. Anthropology Today. 30(3):1-2.

2013. Introduction. Non-dualism is philosophy not ethnography. Critique of Anthropology. 33(3):300-360.

2013. The Spirit of Rabaul after the Volcano. Paideuma. 59:195–215.

2012. Big men and Business: Morality, Debt and the Corporation. Social Anthropology. 20(4):482-5.

2012. The Potlatch of Destruction: Gifting against the State. Critique of Anthropology. 32(2):125-42.

2010. Robert Macnamara and the limits of bean counting. Anthropology Today. 26(3):16-9.

2010. Living Pasts: Contested Tourism Authenticities. Annals of Tourism Research. 37(2):537-54.

2010. The Death of the Big Men: Depreciation of Elites in New Guinea. Ethnos. 75(1):1-22.

2009. Den Store Haj Jagt. Jordens Folk. 44(4):20-25.

2009. Names as Markers and Makers of Contested Identity: on Social Groups in the New Guinea Highlands. Oceania. 79(2):162-76.

2008. The work of tourism and the fight for a new economy; the case of the Papua New Guinea Mask Festival. Tourism, Culture and Communication. 8(2):97-107.

2008. Tourism as social contest. Introduction for special issue of Tourism, Culture and Communication. 8(2):59-69.

2007. Your own buai you must buy: the contested ideology of Possessive Individualism in East New Britain. Anthropological Forum. 17(3):285-98.

2007. The chairman of the clan; emerging social divisions in a Melanesian social movement. Paideuma. 53:111-125.

2006. A fish trap for custom; how nets work at Matupit. Paideuma. 52:73-90.

Book chapters.

2018. This custom from the past is no good. In C. Gregory and J. Altman (eds.) Domestic Moral Economies: The Search for the good life. Canberra. Australian National University Press.

2018. ‘It was harder before: we lived by the market’: (hopes and fears of a market-free future in East New Britain). In H Han and G Schmitz (eds). Market as Place and Space of Economic Exchange: Perspectives from Anthropology and Archaeology. OXBOW Press.

2017. Corporate groups from New Guinea to New York: on the overheating of bounded corporate entities in contemporary global capitalism. In T. Eriksen (ed.) Overheating: Towards an Anthropological History of the Twenty-First Century. London. Routledge. Co-authored with Adam Leaver.

2016. ‘We’re Far Too Far Down This Road Now to Worry about Morals’: The Destabilising of Football Fans’ Identities in an Overheated World. In T. Eriksen and E. Schober (eds.) Identity Destabilised. Pp. 205-222. London. Pluto Press.

2015. Modernity Tourism. In J. Jafari and H. Xiao (eds.) Encyclopedia of Tourism. Springer International Publishing.

2015. Exchange and Corporate Forms today. In J. Kjaerulff (ed.) Flexible Capitalism: Exchange and Ambiguity at Work. Pp. 261-276. New York. Berghahn Books.

2013. Gift Exchange. In R. McGee and R. Warms (eds.) Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology. Pp. 323-326. Thousand Oaks. Sage Books.

2010. Cultural Anthropology. In M. Ryan (ed.) The Encyclopaedia of Literary and Cultural Theory. Oxford. Blackwell.

2008. Custom: The Limits of Reciprocity in Village Redevelopment. In K. Sykes (ed.) Ethnographies of Moral Reasoning: Living Paradoxes of a Global Age. Pp. 93-116. New York. Palgrave.

2007. Land customary and non-customary in East New Britain. In J. Weiner and K. Glaskin (eds.) Indigenous land tenure in Papua New Guinea and Australia. Pp. 39-56. Canberra. ANU Press.

Published Nov. 11, 2014 9:42 AM - Last modified July 8, 2018 4:38 PM