Globalization has broken the chain of responsibility

In his new book, “Boomtown”, Thomas Hylland Eriksen investigates the ambivalence and conflict in Gladstone, Australia, a community that is struggling with the effects of globalization.

An important focus in the book “Boomtown. Runaway Globalisation on the Queensland Coast”is how the gap between the people affected by change in local environments and the people in charge is growing even wider.

Eriksen examines how the logic of big industry and the state compete with that of the individual, local communities and ecology, revealing the current crisis of political legitimacy across the world.

Gladstone embodies many of the contradictions of the overheated world: prosperous yet polluted; growing and developing yet always on the precipice of uncertainty.

Read more in this interview in anthropologyworks:

Eriksen on Australia's boomtown and its ecological sustainability

In the ecologist:

Industrialism and ambivalence on the Queensland coast

In sapiens:

How Globalization has broken the Chain of responsibility

and on Eriksen’s blog:

Boomtown

The fieldwork was conducted as part of UiO’s large research project “Overheating” that focused on the three crisis of globalization.

Published Aug. 15, 2018 10:43 AM - Last modified Aug. 15, 2018 10:43 AM