"Maritime Anthropology" Podcast trailer

In December, the "Containerships"-team got together to learn a new skill that we think will come in handy over the next few years: academic podcasting.

Photo by Julie Jung.

The "Containerships"-team + friends recently received a visit by academic podcasters Ian M. Cook and Dumitria Holdis (both affiliated with Central European University's Center for Media, Data and Society). Over a two-day workshop entitled "Don't contain your podcast", the group learned the essentials of podcasting (online on-demand radio). The course involved discussions around structuring, editing, story-writing and recording, and lots of opportunity for hands-on training both at Blindern and elsewhere in Oslo.

 

Photo by Julie Jung.
Photo by Julie Jung.

 

 

 

Listen to the trailer we produced, which is meant as a teaser for more content to come:

 

"More than seventy percent of the world’s surface is ocean. And yet we are remarkably sea blind.  Ninety percent of the world’s goods come to us over the sea.  The coffee we drink, the clothes we wear, the food we eat. Even the phone or computer you’re using to listen to this podcast. Chances are, they came to us from across the sea. But few of us are aware of this.

Welcome to the Maritime Anthropology Podcast. In this series we invite scholars, artists, activists and members of the maritime community to discuss the sea as a social, economic and environmental space.

We are a group of maritime anthropologists based at the University of Oslo. Some of us are affiliated with the Life Cycle of Container ship project funded by the Norwegian Research council.

This series will take us across the world to shipyards in Korea, to seafaring communities in the Philippines, and the polluting shipbreaking yards of South Asia and even out to sea. Do join us on this journey. Find out more about us at uio.no/containerships and stay tuned!"

Photo by Julie Jung.

 

 

Published Jan. 13, 2019 7:31 PM - Last modified Jan. 13, 2019 7:31 PM