Knowing and unknowing of AMR among Tanzanian pastoralists: local conceptualizations about (mis)appropriations of veterinary knowledge

Peter Ernest Mangesho from the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in Tanzania will join us for a seminar entitled "Knowing and unknowing of AMR among Tanzanian pastoralists: local conceptualizations about (mis)appropriations of veterinary knowledge "

The seminar is open to all, including bachelor and master students. No registration is required. After the seminar, drinks and snacks will be served in our lunchroom.

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Veterinary drugs including antimicrobials (AMs) have been in use by Maasai pastoralists for many years, albeit with little or no supervision. In spite of the fact that the law requires certain degree of supervision pastoralists, combined with local indigenous knowledge of their livelihoods, livestock diseases and their ecosystem, veterinary drugs have become what anthropological scholars have termed  ‘valuable things’, mainly as a tool for survival that should never fail. The war on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), posited as the overuse and misuse, in ways that are incongruent to established veterinary treatment standards, and demand behavior change to reverse the trend, may miss important aspects in addressing AMR in some settings that is the use of AMs is often grounded to local realities. This presentation argues that key to disentangle AMs ‘misuse’ and AMR among pastoralists is first to ascertain how AMs and AMR are locally conceptualized while taking note of the social and cultural meanings of livestock livelihoods and animal health in turn influence the outcome of vet drugs use. At the end, it argues that there is a need of having a continuous engagement and dialogue with pastoralists on one hand, veterinary drug officials on the other, in order to bridge the gap of these two knowledge systems, paramount for sustaining any meaningful interventions to control AMR.

Peter Ernest Mangesho is a Medical Anthropologist and Sociologist and a Principal Research Scientist working with the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in Tanzania. His current project engages with One Health and EcoHealth approaches, focusing on zoonosess and antimicrobial resistance management and control in Africa. He is also a collaborator on the "AnthroTox" project.

Published Aug. 6, 2019 5:56 PM - Last modified Aug. 7, 2019 4:14 PM