RELIGIOUS RITUALS AND CHANGE

This session aims at questioning how both practitioners and religious authorities accept, reject or negotiate rituals changes (in situations of mobility, at exceptional times such as wars, or as adaptations to secularization processes, etc.).

Religious rituals can be associated with repetition and immemorial practices. Indeed, they are often practiced in order to gain and reaffirm a sense of self and identity. But as any other cultural activity, they are submitted to social change and variations in form, scale, and meaning. This session aims at questioning how both practitioners and religious authorities accept, reject or negotiate rituals changes (in situations of mobility, at exceptional times such as wars, or as adaptations to secularization processes, etc.). What is considered to be a legitimate change in religious rituals? How is change justified? All small ritual variations, even within the more systemized ritual traditions, are not perceived as meaningful. When are variations in the execution of rituals perceived as a meaningful change, and when are they turned into objects of debate? In which conditions is change considered to be problematic? This session addresses these issues.

SUBMIT A PAPER

ORGANIZERS:

SABINA HADZIBULIC & EMIR MAHIEDDIN

Uppsala University, Sweden

sabina.hadzibulic@crs.uu.se

emir.mahieddin@crs.uu.se

 

 

 

 

 

Published Feb. 14, 2018 1:15 PM - Last modified Feb. 14, 2018 1:15 PM