INTERACTING WITH RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

This session intends to explore ideas on suspending judgment and the importance of reflexivity in the course of data gathering/field work, as well as facilitating discussion on concepts such as perceived intellectual superiority, the infallibility of academia, and possible alternatives to the duality of believing and not believing.

When conducting research with members of religious movements, what is the researcher's intellectual position and attitude towards those being studied? Is it ever appropriate to dismiss their beliefs? Where should respect for others' beliefs end, and responsibility to the wider society begin? This session intends to explore ideas on suspending judgment and the importance of reflexivity in the course of data gathering/field work, as well as facilitating discussion on concepts such as perceived intellectual superiority, the infallibility of academia, and possible alternatives to the duality of believing and not believing. The session will examine and discuss contemporary academic approaches to both sides of the emic/emit debate, and explore the possibility of a third alternative in which the research neither goes native nor maintains the clinical distance of an allegedly intellectual superior position. The session will also reflect on identity and what is means to be an academic.

SUBMIT A PAPER

ORGANIZER:

GARRY MCSWEENEY

Griffith University, Australia

g.mcsweeney@griffith.edu.au

 

 

 

 

Published Feb. 14, 2018 1:15 PM - Last modified Feb. 14, 2018 1:15 PM