Oslo Summer School in Comparative Social Science Studies 2011

Power and Organizations

Lecturer: Professor Stewart Clegg
UTS Business School
University of Technology, Sydney
Australia

Main disciplines: Sociology, Political Science, Organization Studies
Dates: 1 - 5 August 2011
Course Credits: 10 pts (ECTS)
Limitation: 30 participants


Objectives
Organization Studies is a hybrid area that has formed, largely in Business Schools, out of the meeting of an essentially social science view of organizations (as opposed to a more managerialist or economistic view) in which the sociology of organizations is a dominant element. Its aim is to situate organizational relations within an account of social ordering, both within and without, organizations. The focus is on organization, organizations and organizing. To address these adequately power relations have to be in central focus.

Organizations are both crucibles of power relations and major power actors in the contemporary world. Unfortunately, power has rarely been addressed adequately by much management theory, which, where it has addressed power relations often see them as illegitimate.

The objective of this course is to present current research related to power and organizations to which the lecturer has made a significant contribution. The argument of the subject will be that an appropriate understanding of power and organizations should be grounded in the major streams of political theory in the West, notably the traditions inspired by Hobbes and Machiavelli.

 

Basic books for preparation in the course
Students should obtain and read these books in advance of the course:

  • Lukes, S. (1974) Power: A Radical View, London: Macmillan (read in its brief entirety)
  • Clegg, S. R. & Haugaard, M. (2010) The Sage Handbook of Power, London: Sage. (browse as per interests)
  • Clegg, S. R. (1989) Frameworks of Power, London: Sage, (chapter 1 in advance).
  • Clegg, S, R., Courpasson, D., and Phillips, N. (2006) Power and Organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, (chapter 1 in advance).
     

Note! Clegg, S. R. & Haugaard, M. (2010) The Sage Handbook of Power, London: Sage. will be provided for all students in advance of the course. You do not need to buy this book yourself.

 

LECTURE OUTLINE

Monday 1 August

Lecture 1: Introduction to the roots of modern power conceptions: Machiavelli & Hobbes.

On the basic building blocks of modern analyses of power relations.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. (1989) Frameworks of Power, London: Sage, chapter 1.
  • Machiavelli, N. (1961) The Prince, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • Abramson, J. (2009) Minerva’s Owl: The Tradition of Western Political Thought, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Hobbes, T. (2010) Leviathan: Or the Matter, Forme, and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civill, ed. by Ian Shapiro, Yale: Yale University Press.
  • Ball, T, (1988) The changing face of power, pp. 80-105 in Ball, T. Transforming Political Discourse: Political Theory and Critical Conceptual History, Oxford: Blackwell.
     


Lecture 2: Introduction to the foundations of modern management theory: power in practice if not in theory.

Management recasts power relations in a theory absent of an explicit theory of power.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chapter 2.
  • Taylor, F. W. (1911) Principles of Scientific Management, New York: Harper.
  • Meyer, S. (1981). The five dollar day: labor management and social control in the Ford Motor Company, 1908–1921. Albany, NY: State University of New York.

 

Tuesday 2 August

Lecture 3: From corporeal power to normative power: the importance of body and soul.

The emergence of normative ordering in power relations in work as the normal methodology of power in organizations.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chapter 3.
  • Mayo, E. (1933). The human problems of an industrial civilization. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

Lecture 4: What about Weber?

The foundational analyses of power in organizations in the sociology of literature comes from Wax Weber’s work.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chapter 4.
  • Weber, M. (1962). Basic concepts in sociology. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel
  • Cohen, J., Hazelrigg, L., & Pope, W. (1975a). De-Parsonizing Weber: a critique of Parsons’ interpretation of Weber’s sociology. American Sociological Review, 40(S), 229–241.
  • Parsons, T. (1975). On ‘de-Parsonizing’ Weber (comment on Cohen et al.). American Sociological Review, 40, 666–670.
  • Cohen, J., Hazelrigg, L., & Pope, W. (1975b). Reply to Parsons. American Sociological Review, 40(S), 670–674.

 

Wednesday 3 August

Lecture 5: Causal power and organization analysis.

Conflict, power as deviance, systems frameworks, what about authority, and is there an alternative to hierarchy?

Readings:

  • Hickson, D. J., Hinings, C. R., Lee, C. A., Schneck, R. E., & Pennings, J. M. (1971). A strategic contingencies theory of intraorganizational power. Administrative Science Quarterly, 16(2), 216–229.
  • Salancik, G. R. & Pfeffer, J. 1974. The bases and use of power in organizational decision-making: The case of a university. Administrative Science Quarterly, 19(4): 453-473.
  • Fairtlough, G. (2005). The three ways of getting things done: hierarchy, heterarchy and responsible autonomy in organizations. Greenways, Dorset: Triarchy.
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chapter 5.
  • Clegg, S. R. (1989) Frameworks of power, London: Sage, ch. 6.

 

Lecture 6: Total institutions and organization analysis.

Extreme cases reveal the contours of the normal more sharply.

Readings:

  • Milgram, S. (1974). Obedience to authority. New York: Harper-Collins.
  • Bauman, Z. (1997) Modernity and the Holocaust, Cambridge: Polity.
  • Goffman, E. (1961) Asylums, Harnondsworth: Penguin.
  • Haney, C., Banks, C., & Zimbardo, P. (1973) Interpersonal dynamics in a simulated prison. International Journal of Criminology and Psychology, 1, 69–97.
  •  www.prisonexp.org
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chapter 6.

 

Thursday 4 August

Lecture 7: Dimensions of power.

Three dimensions; four dimensions?

Readings:

  • Lukes, S. (1974; 2005) Power: a radical view (1st & 2nd eds) London: Macmillan.
  • Clegg, S. R. (1974) Frameworks of power, London: Sage, ch’s 4, 5.
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, London: Sage, ch 7.
  • Hardy, C., & Leiba-O’Sullivan, S. (1998). The power behind empowerment: implications for research and practice. Human Relations, 51(4), 451–483.

 

Thursday 4 August

Lecture 7: The Foucault effect.

Sovereign power, disciplinary power, bio-power.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. (1974) Frameworks of power, London: Sage, ch. 7
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, London: Sage, ch 7.
  • Foucault, M. (1977) Discipline & punish, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • Jørgensen, K. M. (2007) Power without glory, Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press.

 

Lecture 8: Circuits of power.

New metaphors for power analysis: circuits and flows.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. (1974) Frameworks of power, London: Sage, ch. 8
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, London: Sage, ch 8.

 

Friday 5 August

Lecture 9: Critical and discursive approaches to power.

Power, resistance and language; critical management studies (CMS).

Readings:

  • Gordon, R. Power, Knowledge and Domination, Liber: Copenhagen Business School Press
  • Clegg, S. R. (1975) Power, rule and domination, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chs 9 & 10
  • Fleming, P. and Spicer, A., Contesting the corporation, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

 

Lecture 10: Power, elites and the politics of organizations today.

Power, elites, democracy, oligarchy, projects.

Readings:

  • Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, chs 11, 12, 13
  • Courpasson, D. and Dany, D. (2006) Creative Resistance: How Employees Change the Workplace Through Resistance pp. 324 – 339 in Clegg, S. R. & Haugaard, M. (eds), The Sage handbook of power, London: Sage.
  • Courpasson, D. Clegg, S. R., and Dany, F. (forthcoming) ‘‘Resisters at work: Generating productive resistance in the workplace” Organization Science.
  • Courpasson, D., and Clegg, S. R., (forthcoming) ‘The Polyarchic Organization: Internal Contention In The Workplace And The Construction Of A New Political Structure’, Research in the Sociology of Organizations
  • Clegg, S. R. (forthcoming) The End of Bureaucracy, Research in the Sociology of Organizations.

 

The complete reading list

• Abramson, J. (2009) Minerva’s Owl: The Tradition of Western Political Thought, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
• Ball, T, (1988) the changing face of power, pp. 80-105 in Ball, T. Transforming Political Discourse: Political Theory and Critical Conceptual History, Oxford: Blackwell.
• Bauman, Z. (1997) Modernity and the Holocaust, Cambridge: Polity.
• Clegg, S. R. (1975) Power, rule and domination, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
• Clegg, S. R. (forthcoming) The End of Bureaucracy, Research in the Sociology of Organizations.
• Clegg, S. R. et al (2006) Power and organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
• Cohen, J., Hazelrigg, L., & Pope, W. (1975a). De-Parsonizing Weber: a critique of Parsons’ interpretation of Weber’s sociology. American Sociological Review, 40(S), 229–241.
• Cohen, J., Hazelrigg, L., & Pope, W. (1975b). Reply to Parsons. American Sociological Review, 40(S), 670–674.
• Courpasson, D. and Dany, D. (2006) Creative Resistance: How Employees Change the Workplace Through Resistance pp. 324 – 339 in Clegg, S. R. & Haugaard, M. (eds), The Sage handbook of power, London: Sage.
• Courpasson, D. Clegg, S. R., and Dany, F. (forthcoming) ‘‘Resisters at work: Generating productive resistance in the workplace” Organization Science.
• Courpasson, D., and Clegg, S. R., (forthcoming) ‘The Polyarchic Organization: Internal Contention In The Workplace And The Construction Of A New Political Structure’, Research in the Sociology of Organizations
• Fairtlough, G. (2005). The three ways of getting things done: hierarchy, heterarchy and responsible autonomy in organizations. Greenways, Dorset: Triarchy.
• Fleming, P. and Spicer, A., Contesting the corporation, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
• Foucault, M. (1977) Discipline & punish, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
• Goffman, E. (1961) Asylums, Harnondsworth: Penguin.
• Gordon, R. Power, Knowledge and Domination, Liber: Copenhagen Business School Press
• Haney, C., Banks, C., & Zimbardo, P. (1973) Interpersonal dynamics in a simulated prison. International Journal of Criminology and Psychology, 1, 69–97.
• Hardy, C., & Leiba-O’Sullivan, S. (1998). The power behind empowerment: implications for research and practice. Human Relations, 51(4), 451–483.
• Hickson, D. J., Hinings, C. R., Lee, C. A., Schneck, R. E., & Pennings, J. M. (1971). A strategic contingencies theory of intraorganizational power. Administrative Science Quarterly, 16(2), 216–229.
• Hobbes, T. (2010) Leviathan: Or the Matter, Forme, and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civill, ed. by Ian Shapiro, Yale: Yale University Press.
• Jørgensen, K. M. (2007) Power without glory, Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press.
• Lukes, S. (1974; 2005) Power: a radical view (1st & 2nd eds) London: Macmillan.
• Machiavelli, N. (1961) The Prince, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
• Mayo, E. (1933). The human problems of an industrial civilization. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
• Meyer, S. (1981). The five dollar day: labor management and social control in the Ford Motor Company, 1908–1921. Albany, NY: State University of New York.
• Milgram, S. (1974). Obedience to authority. New York: Harper-Collins.
• Parsons, T. (1975). On ‘de-Parsonizing’ Weber (comment on Cohen et al.). American Sociological Review, 40, 666–670.
• Salancik, G. R. & Pfeffer, J. 1974. The bases and use of power in organizational decision-making: The case of a university. Administrative Science Quarterly, 19(4): 453-473.
• Taylor, F. W. (1911) Principles of Scientific Management, New York: Harper.
• Weber, M. (1962). Basic concepts in sociology. Secaucus, NJ: Citadel


The lecturer
Stewart Clegg is Research Professor and Director of the Centre for Management and Organization Studies at the UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney. He has published a great many books, chapters and articles and has been a Visiting Professor in many prestigious universities in Europe and elsewhere. Among his latest publications are Clegg, S. R., Carter, C, Kornberger, M., and Schweitzer, J. (2010) Strategy: Theory & Practice, London: Sage; Harris, M., Hopfl, H., and Clegg, S. R. (eds) (2010) Managing Modernity: Beyond Bureaucracy, Oxford: Oxford University Press; Clegg. S. R. (ed.) (2010) SAGE Directions in Organization Studies (Volumes I-IV), London: Sage; Clegg, S. R., and Haugaard, M. (eds) (2009) Handbook of Power, London: Sage, and Clegg, S. R. and Cooper, C. (eds) (2009) Handbook of Macro Organizational Behaviour, London.

Web page: http://datasearch.uts.edu.au/business/staff/management/details.cfm?StaffId=250
 

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Published Aug. 24, 2011 2:20 PM - Last modified Aug. 24, 2011 2:35 PM