Oslo Summer School in Comparative Social Science Studies 2006


Gender and Work

Lecturer: Associate Professor Julie Brines,
Department of Sociology,
University of Washington, USA

(Associate Professor Julie Brines substituted Professor Barbara Reskin in lecturing this course).

Main discipline: Sociology

Dates: 31 July - 4 August 2006
Course Credits: 10 pts (ECTS)
Limitation: 20 participants
 

Objectives
This seminar will examine the links between gender and labor markets, work organizations, and the family, and how these connections vary cross nationally. We will review explanations for differences in the roles women and men play in the division of labor at work and between work and family and for differences in their opportunities and rewards at work. Finally, we will examine how employers’ practices and public policy contribute to the extent to which workers’ sex affects the work they do and the rewards work provides. Please select one optional reading from an area in which you are familiar to discuss in class.

 

Essential reading
The essential reading for this course is: Padavic, Irene and Barbara Reskin. 2002. Women and Men at Work (2nd ed.). Pine Forge. All students are expected to acquire a copy of it and read the relevant chapters prior to the beginning of the course. It is also strongly suggested to purchase a copy of: Seager, Joni. 2005. The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World: Completely Revised and Updated, as a useful consulting reference throughout the course.


COURSE OUTLINE:

Lecture 1: Introduction to Gender, Work, and Gender at Work

1. Overview of course

2. Theoretical concepts

3. Doing Gender

Readings:

Optional Readings:

 

Lecture 2: Labor Markets, Work, and Gendered Work

1. Conceptualizing work, labor force
2. Terminology
3. Gendered work:
4. Historical overview
5. Cross-national patterns
6. Classification of explanations for gendered work

Readings:


Optional Readings:

 

Lecture 3: Explaining the link between gender and work; Labor force participation

Explaining the association between gender and work:

1. Biology
2. Neoclassical economic theories: human capital
3. Socialization
4. Historical and cultural explanations
5. Competition, patriarchy, opportunity hoarding
6. Social policy

Readings:


Optional Readings:

 

Lecture 4: Explaining variation in labor force participation, domestic work and family

1. Cross-national overview in labor force participation
2. Cross-national patterns in sexual division of labor between work and family
3. Work and family: finding time

Readings:

Optional Readings:

 

 

Lecture 5: Sex segregation at work

1. Measuring sex segregation
2. Cross-national patterns
3. Explaining variation within and across countries

Readings:

Optional Readings:

 

Lecture 6: Sex segregation at work, continued

Readings:

Optional Readings:


 


Lecture 7: Gender, promotions, management

Readings:


Optional Readings:



 

Lecture 8: Gender and earnings

1. Historical trends in the wage gap
2. Cross-national patterns
3. Explanations for variation in the wage gap
-- a. Differences in human capital
-- b. Differences in hours worked
-- c. Devaluation of women’s work
 

Readings:

 

Optional Readings:

 

Lecture 9: Globalization and gendered work

Readings:

 

Lecture 10: Policies that affect gender inequality at work

Readings:


Optional Readings:

 

 

The Lecturer
Julie Brines is Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the Center for Research on Families at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. She has previously taught at Harvard University and the University of Chicago. Prof. Brines's research focuses on gender, work, and family dynamics: specific applications include the division of household labor, gender, work, and interdependence in couple relationships, married women's employment, and patterns of parental investment in sons and daughters. Selected publications include "The Ties that Bind: Principles of Cohesion in Marriage and Cohabitation" (American Sociological Review) and "Gender, Economic Dependency, and the Division of Labor at Home" (American Journal of Sociology). She is currently preparing a book on gender, work, and the reproduction of inequalities within and between families.


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