Oslo Summer School in Comparative Social Science Studies 2016

A Journey through Psychology as an Academic Discipline and Cultural Force: Theory, Practice and Critique

Lecturer: Professor Ian Parker
School of Management
University of Leicester, UK

Main disciplines: Psychology, Sociology,
Critical Psychology, Social Psychology

Dates: 1 - 5 August 2016
Course Credits: 10 pts (ECTS)
Limitation: 25 participants


Objectives
How do people get into psychology? What is psychology really, and how do psychologists try to make sense of other people, the ones who, they think, aren’t like them? And, how do you get out of it? This course is about how I got into it, and out the other side, and along the way I’ll show you how I discovered that psychology is not what you think. You will see how it works and what it does, and why you should beware of the many different contradictory forms of discipline it imposes on psychologists as well as on those they study. 

 


Readings
The course traces a narrative which will lead us to reflect on issues raised in the following sources which you may consult before the course: 

  • Annual Review of Critical Psychology: http://www.discourseunit.com/annual-review/
  • Parker, I. (2007) Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation. London: Pluto Press.
  • Parker, I. (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology (Four-Volumes). London and New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (ed.) (2015a) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London and New York: Routledge.
     

Outline of lectures

Day 1, 1 August 2016, morning

Session 1:
In which we encounter psychology for the first time, and make a connection between separation of the individual from context in the discipline and loneliness.

Readings

  • Canguilhem, G. (1958) ‘What is psychology?’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and Their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Cosgrove, L., Wheeler, E. E. and Kosterina, E. (2015) ‘Quantitative methods: Science means and ends’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Montero, M. (2015) ‘Political Psychology: Critical Approaches to Power’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London and New York: Routledge. 
  • Parker, I. (2015b) ‘Introduction: Principles and positions’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Session 2:
In which we notice how approaches to politics are marginalised in psychology to protect the discipline from taking seriously some of its most terrible historical mistakes. 

Readings

  • Arfken, M. (2015) ‘Cognitive psychology: From the bourgeois individual to class struggle’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Bowers, J.M. (1991) ‘Time, representation and power/knowledge: Towards a critique of cognitive science as a knowledge-producing practice’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Kvale, S. (1975) ‘Memory and dialectics: Some reflections on Ebbinghaus and Mao Tse-tung’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Lambley, P. (1973) ‘Psychology and socio-political reality: Apartheid psychology and its link with trends in humanistic psychology and behaviour theory’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.


Day 1, 1 August 2016, afternoon

Session 3:
In which we meet some biological arguments in psychology, some alternative approaches from animal behaviour, and some questions concerning experience. 

Readings

  • Cromby, J. (2015) ‘Biological and evolutionary psychologies: The limits of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Haraway, D. (1989) ‘Metaphors into hardware: Harry Harlow and the technology of love’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Tamboukou, M. (2003) ‘Interrogating the “emotional turn”: Making connections with Foucault and Deleuze’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Wertz, F. J. (1994) ‘Of rats and psychologists: A study of the history and meaning of science’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge


Session 4:
In which we encounter alternatives to the methods psychology uses to study and assess people, and explore some different ways of making and breaking the rules.

Readings

  • Billington, T. and Williams, T. (2015) ‘Education and psychology: Change at last?’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Gough, B. (2015) ‘Qualitative methods: Critical practices and prospects from a diverse field’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Harré, R. (2004) ‘Staking our claim for qualitative psychology as science’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Skott-Myhre, H. (2015) ‘Deleuzian perspectives: Schizoanalysis and the politics of desire’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 2, 2 August 2016, morning

Session 5:
In which we search for a place to look at the limitations of psychology, and find it in Southampton, inside a psychology department, through a series of performances.

Readings

  • Alldred, P. and Fox, N. (2015) ‘From “lesbian and gay psychology” to a critical psychology of sexualities’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Broughton, J. (1988) ‘The masculine authority of the cognitive’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Capdevila, R. and Lizard, L. (2015) ‘Psychology of women: Questions of politics and practice’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 
  • Mattos, A. (2015) ‘Feminist psychology: Researches, interventions, challenges’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Session 6:
In which we settle into academic life, finding out what it might mean to carry out empirical research, and something about how a psychology department works. 

Readings

  • Foucault, M. (1970) ‘The order of discourse’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Dominant Models of Psychology and Their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Hook, D. (2001) ‘Discourse, knowledge and materiality: Foucault and discourse analysis’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Ingleby, D. (1985) ‘Professionals as socializers: The “psy complex”’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and Their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Reed, E. (1996) ‘The challenge of historical materialist epistemology’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge. 


Day 2, 2 August 2016, afternoon

Session 7:
In which we discover theories outside psychology that replace the way we talk about individual selves inside the discipline with descriptions of who we are as subjects.

Readings

  • Hollway, W. (1984) ‘Gender difference and the production of subjectivity’, in, J. Henriques, W. Hollway, C. Urwin, C. Venn and V. Walkerdine (1998) Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity, Second Edition. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Kothari, U. (2001) ‘Power, knowledge and social control in participatory development’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Elhammoumi, M. (2015) ‘Marxist psychology and dialectical method’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Walkerdine, V. (1981) ‘Sex, power and pedagogy’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.


Session 8:
In which we learn how to piece together many different arguments from outside psychology into a doctoral thesis that will serve as a thesis, and then defend it in an examination.

Readings

  • Burman, E. (2015) ‘Developmental psychology: The turn to deconstruction’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Butler, J. (1994) ‘Gender as performance: An interview with Judith Butler’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Malone, K. R. with Friedman, E. (2015) ‘Does psychoanalysis have anything to say to critical psychology?’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Teo, T. (2015) ‘Theoretical psychology: A critical-philosophical outline of core issues’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 3, 3 August 2016, morning
 
Session 9:
In which we begin teaching psychology and learn to find our way around the inside of the department and the different other parts of the university. 

Readings

  • House, R. and Feltham, C. (2015) ‘Counselling psychology: Critical achievements, possibilities, and limitations’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 
  • Igarashi, Y. (2015) ‘Health psychology: Towards critical psychologies for well-being and social justice’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 
  • Mills, C. (2015) ‘Personality: Technology, commodity and pathology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 
  • Tudor, K. (2015) ‘Humanistic psychology: A critical counter culture’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Session 10:
In which we learn that the more we teach about psychology, the more we speak about it, the more it enters our lives, and we actually start believing some of it ourselves.

Readings

  • Gordo López, Á, J. and Rodríguez López, R. (2015) ‘European critical psychological trends: An open road to psychological recidivism’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Madsen, O. J. (2015) ‘Psychotherapists: Agents of change or maintenance men?’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Roselló Peñaloza, M. and Cabruja Ubach, T. (2015) ‘Queer theory: disarticulating critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Skott-Myhre, K. S. (2015) ‘A politically informed immanent spirituality for critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 3, 3 August 2016, afternoon

Session 11:
In which we connect internal critiques of academic psychology with attempts by professionals to speak out against abuses of power and engage with political debates.

Readings

  • Grech, S. (2015) ‘From critical disability studies to critical global disability studies’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • McLaughlin, K. (2003) ‘Agency, resilience and empowerment: The dangers posed by a therapeutic culture’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Pupavac, V. (2004) ‘War on the couch: The emotionology of the new international security paradigm’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Stevens, G. (2015) ‘Black psychology: Resistance, reclamation, and redefinition’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Session 12:
In which we discover how clinical psychology and psychiatry work together to treat distress as something abnormal, and how the patients organise themselves to fight back.

Readings

  • Clark, A. and Hepburn, A. (2015) ‘Deconstruction: The foundations of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Haaken, J. (2015) ‘Alienists and alienation: Critical psychiatry in search of itself’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • McLaughlin, T. (1996) ‘Coping with hearing voices: An empancipatory discourse analytic approach’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Nayak, S. (2015) ‘Social work: Oppression and resistance’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 4, 4 August 2016, morning

Session 13:
In which we discover that psychology tells stories about individuals, and that the discipline can itself be treated as a series of discourses suffused with power.

Readings

  • Gergen, K. J. (1973) ‘Social psychology as history’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Nikander, P. (1995) ‘The turn to the text: The critical potential of discursive social psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Wetherell, M. (2015) ‘Discursive psychology: Key tenets, some splits, and two examples’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • White, M. (1989) ‘The externalizing of the problem and the re-authoring of lives and relationships’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.


Session 14:
In which we learn something about what psychologists think about groups, and what it is like to encounter organised groups, and to be seen as working inside one.

Readings

  • Dafermos, M. (2015) ‘Activity theory: Theory and practice’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Hood, L. and Newman, F. (1983) ‘Tools and results: Understanding, explaining and meaning (three sides of one dialectical coin)’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London: Routledge.
  • Reicher, S (1982) ‘The determination of collective behaviour’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Spink, M. J. P. and Spink, K. (2015) ‘Organizational psychology and social issues: The place of the place’, in in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 4, 4 August 2016, afternoon

Session 15:
In which we move further out to the edge, and discover how smaller teaching institutions limit psychology and possibilities for doing things differently.

Readings

  • Painter, D. (2015) ‘Postcolonial theory: towards a worlding of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Palmary, I. and Barnes, B. (2015) ‘Critical psychology in Africa: the impossible task’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Ruiz, M. R. (2015) ‘Behaviourisms: Radical behaviourism and critical inquiry’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Ulman, J. D. (1991) ‘Toward a synthesis of Marx and Skinner’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.


Session 16:
In which the qualms and complaints about what the discipline does to people is crystallised as ‘critical psychology’ which pretends to provide something completely different.

Readings

  • Holzkamp, K. (1992) ‘On doing psychology critically’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Motzkau, J. and Schraube, E. (2015) ‘Kritische Psychologie: Psychology from the standpoint of the subject’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Paredes-Canilao, N., Babaran-Diaz, A., Florendo, N. B, and Salinas-Ramos, T. with Mendoza, S. L. (2015) ‘Indigenous psychologies and critical-emancipatory psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Stenner, P. (2015) ‘Emotion: Being moved beyond the mainstream’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge. 


Day 5, 5 August 2016, morning

Session 17:
In which we return home, to discover that there is more to psychology than teaching and research, and get recruited into some administrative manoeuvres.

Readings

  • Burton, M. and Gómez Ordóñez, L. H. (2015) ‘Liberation psychology: Another kind of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Fryer, D. and Fox, R. (2015) ‘Community Psychology: Subjectivity, Power, Collectivity’, in I. Parker. (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Guzzo, R. S. L. (2015) ‘Critical psychology and the American continent: From colonization and domination to liberation and emancipation’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Martín-Baró, I. (1994) ‘Toward a liberation psychology, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.


Session 18:
In which we try to make psychological sense of what we are subjected to in the discipline as it functions institutionally and are led to reflect on psychologisation.

Readings

  • Cromby, J. and Harper, D. (2009) ‘Paranoia: A social account’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • De Vos, J. (2009) ‘Now That You Know, How Do You Feel? The Milgram Experiment and Psychologization’, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 7, pp. 223-246.
  • De Vos, J. (2015) ‘Self-help: And pop psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Gordo López, Á. J. (2000) ‘On the psychologization of critical psychology’, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 2, pp. 55–71.


Day 5, 5 August 2016, afternoon

Session 19:
In which management changes bring psychology into play and into question, forcing a dispute which leads from regulation to resistance, from obedience to escape.

Readings

  • Burman, E. (2006) ‘Emotions and reflexivity in feminised action research’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Dashtipour, P. (2015) ‘Social psychology: A commentary on organizational research’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Hochschild, A. (1979) ‘Emotion work, feeling rules and social structure’, American Journal of Sociology, 85, (3), pp. 551-575.
  • Lorenz, C. (2012) ‘If You're So Smart, Why Are You under Surveillance? Universities, Neoliberalism, and New Public Management’, Critical Inquiry, 38, (3), pp. 599-629.


Session 20:
In which we finally extricate ourselves from psychology, but learn that it is not so easy to leave wider network of theories and practices that comprise the psy-complex.

Readings

  • Bramel, D., and Friend, R. (1981) ‘Hawthorne, the myth of the docile worker, and class bias in psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Contu, A. (2014) ‘Rationality and Relationality in the Process of Whistleblowing: Recasting Whistleblowing Through Readings of Antigone’, Journal of Management Inquiry, 23, (4), pp. 393-406.
  • Hayes, G. (1998) ‘We suffer our memories: Thinking about the past, healing and reconciliation’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Shotter, J. (1987) ‘Cognitive psychology, “Taylorism” and the manufacture of unemployment’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
     

Bibliography

  • Adlam, D., Henriques, J., Rose, N., Salfield, A., Venn, C. and Walkerdine, V. (1977) ‘Psychology, ideology and the human subject’, Ideology and Consciousness, 1: 5–56.
  • Alldred, P. and Fox, N. (2015) ‘From “lesbian and gay psychology” to a critical psychology of sexualities’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Annual Review of Critical Psychology: http://www.discourseunit.com/annual-review/
  • Arfken, M. (2015) ‘Cognitive psychology: From the bourgeois individual to class struggle’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Billig, M. (1976) Social Psychology and Intergroup Relations. London: Academic Press.
  • Billig, M. (1977) ‘The new social psychology and "fascism"‘, European Journal of Social Psychology 7: 393-432.
  • Billington, T. and Williams, T. (2015) ‘Education and psychology: Change at last?’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Bowers, J.M. (1991) ‘Time, representation and power/knowledge: Towards a critique of cognitive science as a knowledge-producing practice’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Bramel, D., and Friend, R. (1981) ‘Hawthorne, the myth of the docile worker, and class bias in psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Broughton, J. (1988) ‘The masculine authority of the cognitive’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Burman, E. (2006) ‘Emotions and reflexivity in feminised action research’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Burman, E. (2015) ‘Developmental psychology: The turn to deconstruction’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Burton, M. and Gómez Ordóñez, L. H. (2015) ‘Liberation psychology: Another kind of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Butler, J. (1994) ‘Gender as performance: An interview with Judith Butler’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge. Capdevila, R. and Lizard, L. (2015) ‘Psychology of women: Questions of politics and practice’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Canguilhem, G. (1958) ‘What is psychology?’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and Their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Clark, A. and Hepburn, A. (2015) ‘Deconstruction: The foundations of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Contu, A. (2014) Rationality and Relationality in the Process of Whistleblowing: Recasting Whistleblowing Through Readings of Antigone’, Journal of Management Inquiry, 23, (4), pp. 393-406.
  • Coombes, L. and Morgan, M. (2015) ‘South Pacific: Tensions of space in our place’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Cosgrove, L., Wheeler, E. E. and Kosterina, E. (2015) ‘Quantitative methods: Science means and ends’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Cromby, J. (2015) ‘Biological and evolutionary psychologies: The limits of critical psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Cromby, J. and Harper, D. (2009) ‘Paranoia: A social account’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 3, Psychologisation and Psychological Culture. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Dafermos, M. (2015) ‘Activity theory: Theory and practice’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Dashtipour, P. (2015) ‘Social psychology: A commentary on organizational research’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • De Vos, J. (2009) ‘Now That You Know, How Do You Feel? The Milgram Experiment and Psychologization’, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 7, pp. 223-246.
  • De Vos, J. (2015) ‘Self-help: And pop psychology’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Dhar, A. (2015) ‘“Critical psychology in Asia”: Four fundamental concepts’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Elhammoumi, M. (2015) ‘Marxist psychology and dialectical method’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Foucault, M. (1970) ‘The order of discourse’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Dominant Models of Psychology and Their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Fryer, D. and Fox, R. (2015) ‘Community Psychology: Subjectivity, Power, Collectivity’, in I. Parker. (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Gergen, K. J. (1973) ‘Social psychology as history’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Gordo López, Á, J. and Rodríguez López, R. (2015) ‘European critical psychological trends: An open road to psychological recidivism’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Gordo López, Á. J. (2000) ‘On the psychologization of critical psychology’, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 2, pp. 55–71.
  • Gough, B. (2015) ‘Qualitative methods: Critical practices and prospects from a diverse field’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Grech, S. (2015) ‘From critical disability studies to critical global disability studies’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Guzzo, R. S. L. (2015) ‘Critical psychology and the American continent: From colonization and domination to liberation and emancipation’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Haaken, J. (2015) ‘Alienists and alienation: Critical psychiatry in search of itself’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Haraway, D. (1989) ‘Metaphors into hardware: Harry Harlow and the technology of love’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 1, Dominant Models of Psychology and their Limits. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Harré, R. (2004) ‘Staking our claim for qualitative psychology as science’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Harré, R. and Secord, P. (1972) The Explanation of Social Behaviour. Oxford: Blackwell.
  • Hayes, G. (1998) ‘We suffer our memories: Thinking about the past, healing and reconciliation’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 2, Contradictions in Psychology and Elements of Resistance. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Henriques, J., Hollway, W., Urwin, C. Venn, C., and Walkerdine, V. (1984/1998) Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity. London: Routledge.
  • Hochschild, A. (1979) ‘Emotion work, feeling rules and social structure’, American Journal of Sociology, 85, (3), pp. 551-575.
  • Hollway, W. (1984) ‘Gender difference and the production of subjectivity’, in, J. Henriques, W. Hollway, C. Urwin, C. Venn and V. Walkerdine (1998) Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity, Second Edition. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Holzkamp, K. (1992) ‘On doing psychology critically’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Hood, L. and Newman, F. (1983) ‘Tools and results: Understanding, explaining and meaning (three sides of one dialectical coin)’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change.
  • Hook, D. (2001) ‘Discourse, knowledge and materiality: Foucault and discourse analysis’, in I. Parker (ed.) (2011) Critical Psychology: Critical Concepts in Psychology, Volume 4, Alternatives and Visions for Change. London and New York: Routledge.
  • House, R. and Feltham, C. (2015) ‘Counselling psychology: Critical achievements, possibilities, and limitations’ in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
  • Igarashi, Y. (2015) ‘Health psychology: Towards critical psychologies for well-being and social justice’, in I. Parker (ed.) Handbook of Critical Psychology. London: Routledge.
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The lecturer
Ian Parker is Professor of Management at the University of Leicester, and has visiting professorial posts in Belgium, Brazil, South Africa, Spain and the UK. His research and writing has been in the field of psychoanalysis, psychology and social theory, with a particular focus on discourse, critical psychology, mental health and political practice. He is a practising psychoanalyst, and is currently President of the College of Psychoanalysts - UK. He is Secretary of Manchester Psychoanalytic Matrix and Managing Editor of the Annual Review of Critical Psychology. He is a Fellow of the BPS and the RSA.

His research and writing has been in the field of psychoanalysis, psychology and social theory, with a particular focus on discourse, critical psychology, mental health and political practice. These fields of work each bear on how subjectivity is formed and managed in contemporary culture, and on the way organisational forms reproduce social relationships. He was co-founder, and he is currently co-director (with Professor Erica Burman), of the Discourse Unit (www.discourseunit.com), and details of his publications in different languages can be found at his personal website at www.parkerian.com

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Tags: Psychology, Social Science, Social Psychology, PhD, Summer School, Critical Psychology
Published Aug. 24, 2015 2:25 PM - Last modified Aug. 15, 2016 10:16 AM