Oslo Summer School in Comparative Social Science Studies 2013

Positive Psychology and the Challenge of Diversity in Well-being Promotion

Lecturer: Professor Antonella Delle Fave,
Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy

Main disciplines: Psychology, Social Psychology, Positive Psychology

Dates: 29 July - 2 August 2013
Course Credits: 10 pts (ECTS)
Limitation: 30 participants


Objectives
This course aims at offering an overview of the prominent theories and intervention areas of Positive Psychology. This approach to the study of human functioning has represented a substantial theoretical and empirical shift from the traditional outlook of psychology, focused on compensation of deficits and neutralization of problems. Positive psychology instead investigates the components of well-being, the resources, potentials, competences and abilities that individuals and communities can mobilize or develop in order to enhance their quality of life and to successfully accomplish their process of growth and empowerment. A specific attempt of this course will be the contextualization of positive psychology in time and space, taking into account its historical roots and its cultural aspects.

The promotion of happiness has been a concern for every human society throughout the millennia, and the solutions that have been offered in the past and today can differ according to the social and cultural milieu. In particular, societies today face the crucial challenge of guaranteeing equal rights and an adequate quality of life to citizens showing diversity at multiple levels: culture, religion, education, physical and mental health, social roles, personal goals and expectations. For this reason, the identification of substantial dimensions of well-being, that can be acknowledged and shared by the most diverse individuals, represents the overarching challenge for this young research domain.
 

The major aims of this course are:

  • To provide an overview of the main theories and constructs developed within Positive Psychology
  • To explore conceptualizations of well-being at the cross-cultural and interdisciplinary levels
  • To discuss differences and similarities in the evaluation of well-being constructs across cultures, social contexts, and life conditions
  • To analyze the contribution of Positive Psychology at the socio-cultural level, focusing in particular on
    • Physical and mental health
    • Psychosocial maladjustment
    • Multicultural societies
    • Community and social policies


Basic books/articles for preparation to the course:

  • Seligman, M.E.P., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2000). Positive psychology. An introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5-14.
  • Ryan R. & Deci E. (2001). On happiness and human potentials: A review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Annual review of Psychology, 52:141-166.
  • Reich J.W., Zautra A.J., & Stuart Hall J. (Eds.) The Handbook of Adult Resilience. New York: The Guilford Press.
  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., & Bassi, M. (2011). Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures. Dordrecht: Springer Science.


LECTURE OUTLINE:

Monday 29 July:

Lecture 1: The interdisciplinary context of Positive Psychology
The interest for well-being promotion is not exclusive for psychologists. Sociologists, economists, philosophers, policy makers and health professionals are involved in the identification of strategies to implement the quality of life of individuals and groups.

a) Quality of life studies

Readings:

  • Veenhoven, R. (2000). The four qualities of life. Ordering concepts and measures of the good life. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1, 1-39.
  • Eckersley, R. (2000). The mixed blessings of material progress: diminishing returns in the pursuit of happiness. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1, 267-292.
  • Helliwell, J.H. & Putnam, R.D. (2005). The social context of well-being. In F.A. Huppert, N. Baylis & B. Keverne (Eds.) The science of well-being (pp.435-459). New York: Oxford University Press.

b) Biological and cultural studies

Readings:

  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., & Bassi, M. (2011). Biology, culture and human behavior. In A. Delle Fave, F. Massimini & M. Bassi, Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures (Chapter 2, pp. 19-38). Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Jablonka, E., & Lamb, M.J. (2007). Précis of “Evolution in four dimensions”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30, 353-392.
  • Ahuvia, A.H. (2002). individualism/collectivism and cultures of happiness: a theoretical conjecture on the relationship between consumption, culture and subjective well-being at the national level. Journal of Happiness Studies, 3, 23-36.


Lecture 2: Positive Psychology: The Hedonic perspective
The hedonic view of happiness derives from the conceptualization proposed by Aristippus of Cyrene (IV century BC.), who equated happiness with pleasure. In positive psychology it is centered on the concept of subjective well-being, that includes positive emotions and satisfaction with life.

a) Subjective well-being and its components

Readings:

  • Diener E.(2009) Subjective Well-Being. In E. Diener (Eds.), The Science of Well-being, social indicators research series, vol. 37 pp.11-58. New York: Springer.
  • Rojas, M. (2006). Life satisfaction and satisfaction in domains of life: is it a simple relationship? Journal of Happiness Studies, 7, 467-497.
  • Cummins, R.A. (2010). Subjective Wellbeing, Homeostatically Protected Mood and Depression: A Synthesis. Journal of Happiness Studies, 11, 1-17.

b) Positive emotions and the broaden and build theory

Readings:

  • Garland, E.L., Fredrickson B. L. Kring, A.M., Johnson, D.P., Meyer, P.S, & Penn, D.L. (2010). Upward spirals of positive emotions counter downward spirals of negativity: insights from the broaden-and-build theory and affective neuroscience on the treatment of emotion dysfunctions and deficits in psychopathology. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 849–864.


Tuesday 30 July

Lecture 3: The Eudaimonic perspective (1)
The eudaimonic view stems from Aristotle’s concept of eudaimonia, described in the Nicomachean Ethics as the fulfillment of one’s true nature, that includes both self-actualization and commitment to socially shared goals. In psychology it is neither a subjective feeling, nor an activity, rather stemming from the interaction between the individual and the environment, as the global individual functioning in daily life. Due to this broad definition, in positive psychology eudemonia encompasses several different constructs.

a) Psychological well-being

Reading:

  • Ryff C. D. & Singer B. H. (2008). Know thyself and Become what you are: a eudaimonic approach to psychological well-being. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9,13-39.

b) Self-Determination and Basic Psychological Needs

Readings:

  • Deci E. L. & Ryan R. M. (2000). The “what” and “why” of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self-determination of behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11(4):227-268.
  • Ryan, R., Huta, V., & and Deci, E.L. (2008). Living well: a self-determination theory perspective on eudaimonia. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9, 139-170.

c) Psychological selection and Optimal Experience

Readings:

  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., & Bassi, M. (2011). Psychological Selection and Optimal Experience. In A. Delle Fave, F. Massimini & M. Bassi, Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures (Chapter 3, pp. 39-58). Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Delle Fave A., Massimini F. (2005b). The investigation of optimal experience and apathy: developmental and psychosocial implications. European Psychologist, 10, 264-274.


Lecture 4: The Eudaimonic Perspective (2)

a) Meaning and well-being

Readings:

  • Schnell, T. (2011). Individual differences in meaning-making: Considering the variety of sources of meaning, their density and diversity. Personality and Individual Differences 51, 667–673.
  • Schlegel, R.J., & Hicks, J.A. (2011). The true self and psychological health: Emerging evidence and future directions. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 5, 989-1003.
  • Steger, M. F., Kashdan, T. B., Sullivan, B. A., & Lorents, D. (2008). Understanding the search for meaning in life: Personality, cognitive style, and the dynamic between seeking and experiencing meaning. Journal of Personality, 76, 199-228.
  • Delle Fave, A., Wissing, M. P., Brdar, I., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Freire, T. (2012). Perceived meaning and goals in adulthood: Their roots and relation with happiness. In A. Waterman (Ed.), The best within us: Positive Psychology Perspectives on Eudaimonic Functioning. Washington DC: American Psychological Association.

b) Strengths, virtues, and values

Readings:

  • Niemiec, E.M. (2012) VIA Character Strengths - Research and Practice: The First 10 Years. In H.H. Knoop and A. Delle Fave (Eds.) Well-being and Cultures. Perspectives from Positive Psychology  (pp. 11-31). Dordrecht, NL: Springer.
  • Fischer, R., Vauclair, C.M., Fontaine, J.R.J, & Schwartz, S.H. (2010). Are individual-level and country-level value structures different? testing Hofstede’s legacy with the Schwartz value survey. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 41, 135–151.


Wednesday July 31:

Lecture 5: The conceptual  background of Positive Psychology: emergences and divergences
The constructs developed within positive psychology did not arise in a vacuum, but rather derive from previously existing theoretical models. At the same time, since the search for happiness is a universal pursuit, contributions from other traditions can help improve Western models, but only when their background is correctly understood and interpreted.

a) Western theories and Positive Psychology

Readings:

  • Michalos, A.C. & Robinson, S.R. (2012). The Good life: Eight Century to Third Century BCE. In K.C. Land et al. (Eds.), Handbook of Social Indicators and Quality of Life Research (pp. 23-61). Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
  • Keyes C.L.M. & Annas J. (2009). Feeling good and functioning well: distinctive concepts in ancient philosophy and contemporary science. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 197-201.
  • Fowers, B. (2012). Instrumentalism and psychology: beyond using and being used. Theory and Psychology, 20, 102-124.
  • Kristjansson, K. (2010). Positive psychology, happiness, and virtue: the troublesome conceptual issues. Review of General Psychology, 14, 296-310.

b) Eastern perspectives on Positive Psychology

Readings:

  • Chenyang L. (2008). The ideal of harmony in ancient Chinese and Greek philosophy. Dao, 7:81-98.
  • Salagame K.K.K. (2011). Psychology of Yoga and Yoga Psychology. in P.Nikic (Ed.) Proceedings of the 2010 International Interdisciplinary Scientific Conference “Yoga in Science – Future and Perspectives” (pp.41-55). Belgrade, Serbia: Yoga Federation of Serbia.
  • Sundararajan, L. (2008). Towards a reflective Positive Psychology. Theory and Psychology, 18, 655-674.
  • Dambrun, M., Ricard, M., Després, G., Drelon, E., Gibelin, E., Gibelin, M. et al. (2012). Measuring happiness: from fluctuating happiness to authentic-durable happiness. Frontiers in Psychology, DOI: 103897fpsyg.2012.00016


Lecture 6: Harmonizing diversity in positive psychology theories
The polarization between hedonism and eudaimonia is necessary to develop theoretical constructs,  assessment measures, and intervention programs. However, the overarching concept of well-being – or happiness – is an integrated system encompassing conceptual fragmentation.

Readings:

  • Keyes C. L. M., Shmotkin D. & Ryff C. D. (2002). Optimizing well-being: the empirical encounter of two traditions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82:1007-1022.
  • Linley P. A., Maltby J., Wood A. M., Osborne G & Hurling R. (2009). Measuring happiness: The higher order factor structure of subjective and psychological well-being measure. Personality and Individual Differences, 1-7.
  • Delle Fave, A., Brdar, I., Freire, T., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Wissing, M. P. (2011). The eudaimonic and hedonic components of happiness. Social Indicators Research, 100, 158-207.
  • Sirgy, M.J., & Wu, J. (2009). The Pleasant life, the Engaged life, and the Meaningful life: What about the balanced life? Journal of Happiness Studies, 10, 183-196.
  • Peterson, C., Park, N., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Orientations to happiness and life satisfaction: The full life versus the empty life. Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 25-41.
  • Huppert, F.A. & So, T.C.(2011). Flourishing across Europe: application of a new conceptual framework for defining well-being. Social Indicators Research, DOI:10.1007/s11205-011-9966-7


Thursday 1 August

Lecture 7: Cultural diversity: similarities and differences in the conceptualization and evaluation of well-being
The hypothesized universality and relevance of well-being indicators to individual and social functioning needs to be supported by cross-cultural studies. The acknowledgement of cultural differences concerning constructs and strategies to promote well-being can only enrich our understanding of happiness and of the pathways to foster it.

a) Well-being across cultures

Readings:

  • Han A. G. (2008). Building a Harmonious Society and Achieving Individual Harmony. Journal of Chinese Political Science 13(2): 143-164.
  • Wirtz D., Chiu C., Diener E. & Oishi S. (2009). What Constitutes a Good Life? Cultural Differences in the Role of Positive and Negative Affect in Subjective Well-being. Journal of personality 77(4):1168-1195.
  • Joshanloo M. & Ghaedi G. (2009). Value priorities as predictors of hedonic and eudaimonic aspects of well-being. Personality and Individual Differences 47: 294-298.
  • Tafarodi , R.W, Bonn, G.,  Liang, H., Takai, J.,  Moriizumi, S., Belhekar, V., Padhye, A. (2012). What Makes for a Good Life? A Four-Nation Study. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 783-800.
  • Delle Fave, A., Wissing, M. P., Brdar, I., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Freire, T. (2012). Perceived meaning and goals in adulthood: Their roots and relation with happiness. In A. Waterman (Ed.), The best within us: Positive Psychology Perspectives on Eudaimonic Functioning. Washington DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Nafstad, H.E., Blakar, R. M., Botchway, A, Rand-Hendriksen, K. (2009). Globalization, ideologies and well-being: A study of a West African and a North European society. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 305-215.

b) Well-being in multicultural societies

Readings:

  • Phelps, J.M., Blakar, R.M., Carlquist, E., Nafstad, H.E., & Rand-Hendriksen, K. (2012). Symbolic boundaries and ideology in the Norwegian multicultural society: a longitudinal study of public discourse. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 22, 187-205.
  • Delle Fave A. & Bassi M. (2009). Sharing Optimal Experiences and Promoting Good Community Life in a Multicultural Society. Journal of Positive Psychology, 4(4):280-289.
  • Lu, Luo (2006). Cultural fit: individual and societal discrepancies in values, beliefs, and subjective well-being. The Journal of Social Psychology, 146, 203-221.
  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., & Bassi, M. (2011). Acculturation and Optimal Experience. In A. Delle Fave, F. Massimini & M. Bassi, Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures (Chapter 13, pp. 273-294). Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Polgreen, L.A., Simpson, N.B. (2011). Happiness and International Migration. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 819–840.


Lecture 8: Social diversity: well-being and psychosocial maladjustment
Most studies on well-being have been conducted among “normally” functioning populations, enjoying acceptable standards of living, decent housing and work conditions, a healthy network of relationships. What about people living under difficult circumstances?

a) Theories, concepts and models

Readings:

  • Zautra, A., Stuart Hall J., & Murray, K.J. (2010). Resilience. A new definition of health for people and communities. In J.W.Reich, A.J.Zautra, & J. Stuart Hall Eds.) The Handbook of Adult Resilience (pp. 3-29). New York: The Guilford Press.
  • Joseph S., Linley A. (2006). Growth following adversity: Theoretical perspectives and implications for clinical practice. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 1041-1053.
  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., & Bassi, M. (2011). Psychosocial maladjustment and mimetic Flow. In A. Delle Fave, F. Massimini & M. Bassi, Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures (Chapter 15, pp. 321-356). Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Shmotkin, D., Berkovich, M., & Cohen, K. (2006). Combining happiness and suffering in a retrospective view of anchor periods in life: a differential approach to subjective well-being. Social Indicators Research, 77, 139-169.

b) Applications

Readings:

  • Kerfoot, M., Koshyl, V., Roganov, O., Mikhailichenko, K., Gorbova, I., & Pottage, D., (2007). The health and well-being of neglected, abused and exploited children: the Kyiv street children project. Child Abuse and Neglect, 31, 27-37.
  • Lam, D., & Cheng, F., (2008). Chinese policy reaction to the problem of street children: an analysis from the perspective of street children. Children and Youth Services Review, 30, 575-584.
  • Kombarakaran, F.A. (2004). Street children of Bombay: their stresses and strategies of coping. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 853-871.
  • Bogart, L.M., Collins, R.L., Ellickson, P.L., & Klein, D.J. (2007). Are adolescent substance users less satisfied with life as young adults and if so, why? Social Indicators Research, 81, 149-169.
  • Harari, Y.N. (2008). Combat flow: Military, political, and ethical dimensions of subjective well-being in war. Review of General Psychology, 12, 253-264.


Friday 2 August

Lecture 9: Psychophysical diversity: developing resources in disability and chronic disease
Two persons with the same degree of physical health can have different levels of functioning. This depends on variables that differ from physical conditions, but that are nevertheless connected with health: individual psychological features, family and social support, material and economic resources, educational background, cultural representations, and social policies. The psychological variables are of course particularly relevant in the conceptual frame of positive psychology.

a) Physical diversity

Readings:

  • Folkman S. & Greer S. (2000). Promoting psychological well-being in the face of serious illness: when theory, research and practice inform each other. Psycho-Oncology, 9:11-19.
  • Sodergren S. C. & Hyland M. E. (2000). What are the positive consequences of illness? Psychology and Health, 15:85-97.
  • Cortinovis., I., Luraschi, E., Intini, S., Sessa, M., & Delle Fave, A. (2011). The daily experience of people with achondroplasia. Applied Psychology: Health And Well-Being, 3 (2), 207–227.
  • Delle Fave, A., & Massimini, F. (2005). The relevance of subjective wellbeing to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention. In F. Huppert, N. Baylis, & B. Keverne (Eds), The Science of Wellbeing (pp.379-404). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Krahn, G.L., Fujiura, G., Frum, C.E., Cardinal, B.J., Nosek, M.A., the RRTC Expert Panel on Health Measurement (2009). The dilemma of perceived health status in the context of disability. Disability and Health Journal, 2, 49-56.
  • Kuijer, R.G., & deRidder D.T.D. (2003). Discrepancy in illness-related goals and quality of life in chronically ill patients: the role of self-efficacy. Psychology and Health, 18, 313-330.

b) Psychological diversity, psychiatry and intellectual disabilities

Readings:

  • Cummins, R.A: (2005). Caregivers as managers of subjective well-being: a homeostatic perspective. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 18, 335-344.
  • Bassi M., Ferrario N., Ba G., Delle Fave A., Viganò C. (2012). Quality of experience during psychosocial rehabilitation: a real-time investigation with Experience Sampling Method. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal.
  • Jones, J.L. (2012). Factors associated with self-concept: adolescents with intellectual and development disabilities share their perspectives. Intellectual and developmental disabilities, 50, 31-40.
  • Maddux J.E. (2008). Positive psychology and the illness ideology: Toward a positive clinical psychology. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 57 (Suppl 1), 54-70.
  • Marsella A.J., Yamada A.M. (2007). Culture and psychopathology: foundations, issues, and directions. In S. Kitayama & D. Cohen (Eds.), Handbook of Cultural Psychology (pp.797-820). New York: Guilford Press.


Lecture 10: The challenges of social welfare and well-being promotion
An approach focusing on resources and abilities instead of weaknesses and deficits can provide useful information for designing intervention aimed at promoting development and well-being in any domain of society. However, the endeavour is complex and there is no univocal solution that can be considered valid for any social context and community.

Readings:

  • Schimmel J. (2009). Development as Happiness: The Subjective Perception of happiness and UNDP’s Analysis of Poverty, Wealth and Development. Journal of Happiness Studies 10: 93-111.
  • Ott, J. (2005). Level and inequality of happiness in nations: does greater happiness of a grater number imply greater inequality in happiness? Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 397-420.
  • Hernández-Quevedo C., Jones A., López-Nicolás A., Rice N. (2006). Socioeconomic inequalities in health: a comparative longitudinal analysis using the European community household panel. Social Science & Medicine, 63, 1246-1261.
  • WHOQOL Group (2004). Can we identify the poorest quality of life? Assessing the importance of quality of life using the WHOQOL-100. Quality of Life Research, 13, 23-34.
  • Peterson C., Park N. & Sweeney P. J. (2008). Group well-being: morale from a positive psychology perspective. Applied Psychology, 57:19-36.
  • Soosai-Nathan, L., & Delle Fave, A. (in press). The altruism spiral: an integrated model for a harmonious future. In H. Marujo, & L.M. Neto, (Eds.) Building positive nations and communities. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Steger M. F., Kashdan T. B. & Oishi S. (2008). Being good by doing good: Daily eudaimonic activity and well-being. Journal of Research in Personality 42:22-42.
  • Hughes, R.A. (2010). Fostering Resilience through philanthropy. In J.W.Reich, A.J.Zautra, & J. Stuart Hall Eds.) The Handbook of Adult Resilience (pp. 496-515). New York: The Guilford Press.


Total reading list:

  • Ahuvia, A.H. (2002). individualism/collectivism and cultures of happiness: a theoretical conjecture on the relationship between consumption, culture and subjective well-being at the national level. Journal of Happiness Studies, 3, 23-36.
  • Bassi M., Ferrario N., Ba G., Delle Fave A., Viganò C. (2012). Quality of experience during psychosocial rehabilitation: a real-time investigation with Experience Sampling Method. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal.
  • Bogart, L.M., Collins, R.L., Ellickson, P.L., & Klein, D.J. (2007). Are adolescent substance users less satisfied with life as young adults and if so, why? Social Indicators Research, 81, 149-169.
  • Chenyang L. (2008). The ideal of harmony in ancient Chinese and Greek philosophy. Dao, 7:81-98.
  • Cortinovis., I., Luraschi, E., Intini, S., Sessa, M., & Delle Fave, A. (2011). The daily experience of people with achondroplasia. Applied Psychology: Health And Well-Being, 3 (2), 207–227.
  • Cummins, R.A: (2005). Caregivers as managers of subjective well-being: a homeostatic perspective. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 18, 335-344.
  • Cummins, R.A. (2010). Subjective Wellbeing, Homeostatically Protected Mood and Depression: A Synthesis. Journal of Happiness Studies, 11, 1-17.
  • Dambrun, M., Ricard, M., Després, G., Drelon, E., Gibelin, E., Gibelin, M. et al. (2012). Measuring happiness: from fluctuating happiness to authentic-durable happiness. Frontiers in Psychology,
  • Deci E. L. & Ryan R. M. (2000). The “what” and “why” of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self-determination of behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11(4):227-268.
  • Delle Fave A. & Bassi M. (2009). Sharing Optimal Experiences and Promoting Good Community Life in a Multicultural Society. Journal of Positive Psychology, 4(4):280-289.
  • Delle Fave, A., Brdar, I., Freire, T., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Wissing, M. P. (2011). The eudaimonic and hedonic components of happiness. Social Indicators Research, 100, 158-207.
  • Delle Fave A. & Massimini F. (2005). The investigation of optimal experience and apathy: developmental and psychosocial implications. European Psychologist, 10:264-274.
  • Delle Fave, A., & Massimini, F. (2005). The relevance of subjective wellbeing to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention. In F. Huppert, N. Baylis, & B. Keverne (Eds), The Science of Wellbeing (pp.379-404). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Delle Fave, A., Wissing, M. P., Brdar, I., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Freire, T. (2012). Perceived meaning and goals in adulthood: Their roots and relation with happiness. In A. Waterman (Ed.), The best within us: Positive Psychology Perspectives on Eudaimonic Functioning. Washington DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Diener E.(2009) Subjective Well-Being. In E. Diener (Eds.), The Science of Well-being, social indicators research series, vol. 37 pp.11-58. New York: Springer.
  • Eckersley, R. (2000). The mixed blessings of material progress: diminishing returns in the pursuit of happiness. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1, 267-292.
  • Fischer, R., Vauclair C.M.,Fontaine, J.R.J, & Schwartz, S.H. (2010). Are individual-level and country-level value structures different? testing Hofstede’s legacy with the Schwartz value survey. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 41, 135–151.
  • Folkman S. & Greer S. (2000). Promoting psychological well-being in the face of serious illness: when theory, research and practice inform each other. Psycho-Oncology, 9:11-19.
  • Fowers, B. (2012). Instrumentalism and psychology: beyond using and being used. Theory and Psychology, 20, 102-124.
  • Garland, E.L., Fredrickson B. L. Kring, A.M., Johnson, D.P., Meyer, P.S, & Penn, D.L. (2010). Upward spirals of positive emotions counter downward spirals of negativity: insights from the broaden-and-build theory and affective neuroscience on the treatment of emotion dysfunctions and deficits in psychopathology. Clinical Psychology Review, 30, 849–864.
  • Han A. G. (2008). Building a Harmonious Society and Achieving Individual Harmony. Journal of Chinese Political Science 13(2): 143-164.
  • Harari, Y.N. (2008). Combat flow: Military, political, and ethical dimensions of subjective well-being in war. Review of General Psychology, 12, 253-264.
  • Helliwell, J.H. & Putnam, R.D. (2005). The social context of well-being. In F.A. Huppert, N. Baylis & B. Keverne (Eds.) The science of well-being (pp.435-459). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Hernández-Quevedo C., Jones A., López-Nicolás A., Rice N. (2006). Socioeconomic inequalities in health: a comparative longitudinal analysis using the European community household panel. Social Science & Medicine, 63, 1246-1261.
  • Hughes, R.A. (2010). Fostering Resilience through philanthropy. In J.W.Reich, A.J.Zautra, & J. Stuart Hall Eds.) The Handbook of Adult Resilience (pp. 496-515). New York: The Guilford Press.
  • Huppert, F.A. & So, T.C.(2011). Flourishing across Europe: application of a new conceptual framework for defining well-being. Social Indicators Research, DOI:10.1007/s11205-011-9966-7
  • Jablonka, E., & Lamb, M.J. (2007). Précis of “Evolution in four dimensions”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30, 353-392.
  • Joseph S., Linley A. (2006). Growth following adversity: Theoretical perspectives and implications for clinical practice. Clinical Psychology Review, 26, 1041-1053.
  • Jones, J.L. (2012). Factors associated with self-concept: adolescents with intellectual and development disabilities share their perspectives. Intellectual and developmental disabilities, 50, 31-40.
  • Joshanloo M. & Ghaedi G. (2009). Value priorities as predictors of hedonic and eudaimonic aspects of well-being. Personality and Individual Differences 47: 294-298.
  • Kerfoot, M., Koshyl, V., Roganov, O., Mikhailichenko, K., Gorbova, I., & Pottage, D., (2007). The health and well-being of neglected, abused and exploited children: the Kyiv street children project. Child Abuse and Neglect, 31, 27-37.
  • Keyes C. L. M. (2007). Promoting and protecting mental health as flourishing: A complementary strategy for improving national mental health. American Psychologist, 62(2):95-108.
  • Keyes C.L.M. & Annas J. (2009). Feeling good and functioning well: distinctive concepts in ancient philosophy and contemporary science. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 197-201.
  • Keyes C. L. M., Shmotkin D. & Ryff C. D. (2002). Optimizing well-being: the empirical encounter of two traditions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82:1007-1022.
  • Kombarakaran, F.A. (2004). Street children of Bombay: their stresses and strategies of coping. Children and Youth Services Review, 26, 853-871.
  • Krahn, G.L., Fujiura, G., Frum, C.E., Cardinal, B.J., Nosek, M.A., the RRTC Expert Panel on Health Measurement (2009). The dilemma of perceived health status in the context of disability. Disability and Health Journal, 2, 49-56.
  • Kristjansson, K. (2010). Positive psychology, happiness, and virtue: the troublesome conceptual issues. Review of General Psychology, 14, 296-310.
  • Kuijer, R.G., & deRidder D.T.D. (2003). Discrepancy in illness-related goals and quality of life in chronically ill patients: the role of self-efficacy. Psychology and Health, 18, 313-330.
  • Lam, D., & Cheng, F., (2008). Chinese policy reaction to the problem of street children: an analysis from the perspective of street children. Children and Youth Services Review, 30, 575-584.
  • Linley P. A., Maltby J., Wood A. M., Osborne G & Hurling R. (2009). Measuring happiness: The higher order factor structure of subjective and psychological well-being measure. Personality and Individual Differences, 1-7.
  • Lu, Luo (2006). Cultural fit: individual and societal discrepancies in values, beliefs, and subjective well-being. The Journal of Social Psychology, 146, 203-221.
  • Maddux J.E. (2008). Positive psychology and the illness ideology: Toward a positive clinical psychology. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 57 (Suppl 1), 54-70.
  • Marsella A.J., Yamada A.M. (2007). Culture and psychopathology: foundations, issues, and directions. In S. Kitayama & D. Cohen (Eds.), Handbook of Cultural Psychology (pp.797-820). New York: Guilford Press.
  • Massimini F. & Delle Fave A. (2000). Individual development in a bio‑cultural perspective. American Psychologist, 55:24-33.
  • Michalos, A.C. & Robinson, S.R. (2012). The Good life: Eight Century to Third Century BCE. In K.C. Land et al. (Eds.), Handbook of Social Indicators and Quality of Life Research (pp. 23-61). Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
  • Nafstad, H.E., Blakar, R. M., Botchway, A, Rand-Hendriksen, K. (2009). Globalization, ideologies and well-being: A study of a West African and a North European society. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 4, 305-215.
  • Niemiec, E.M. (2012) VIA Character Strengths - Research and Practice: The First 10 Years. In H.H. Knoop and A. Delle Fave (Eds.) Well-being and Cultures. Perspectives from Positive Psychology  (pp. 11-31). Dordrecht, NL: Springer.
  • Ott, J. (2005). Level and inequality of happiness in nations: does greater happiness of a grater number imply greater inequality in happiness? Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 397-420.
  • Peterson C., Park N. & Sweeney P. J. (2008). Group well-being: morale from a positive psychology perspective. Applied Psychology, 57:19-36.
  • Peterson, C., Park, N., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Orientations to happiness and life satisfaction: The full life versus the empty life. Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 25-41.
  • Phelps, J.M., Blakar, R.M., Carlquist, E., Nafstad, H.E., & Rand-Hendriksen, K. (2012). Symbolic boundaries and ideology in the Norwegian multicultural society: a longitudinal study of public discourse. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 22, 187-205.
  • Polgreen, L.A., Simpson, N.B. (2011). Happiness and International Migration. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 819–840.
  • Rojas, M. (2006). Life satisfaction and satisfaction in domains of life: is it a simple relationship? Journal of Happiness Studies, 7, 467-497.
  • Ryan R. & Deci E. (2001). On happiness and human potentials: A review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. Annual review of Psychology, 52:141-166.
  • Ryan, R., Huta, V., & and Deci, E.L. (2008). Living well: a self-determination theory perspective on eudaimonia. Journal of Happiness Studies, 9, 139-170.
  • Ryff C. D. & Singer B. H. (2008). Know thyself and Become what you are: a eudaimonic approach to psychological well-being. Journal of Happiness Studies 9:13-39.
  • Salagame K.K.K. (2011). Psychology of Yoga and Yoga Psychology. in P.Nikic (Ed.) Proceedings of the 2010 International Interdisciplinary Scientific Conference “Yoga in Science – Future and Perspectives” (pp.41-55). Belgrade, Serbia: Yoga Federation of Serbia.
  • Schimmel J. (2009). Development as Happiness: The Subjective Perception of happiness and UNDP’s Analysis of Poverty, Wealth and Development. Journal of Happiness Studies 10: 93-111.
  • Schlegel, R.J., & Hicks, J.A. (2011). The true self and psychological health: Emerging evidence and future directions. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 5, 989-1003.
  • Schnell, T. (2011). Individual differences in meaning-making: Considering the variety of sources of meaning, their density and diversity. Personality and Individual Differences 51, 667–673.
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  • Sodergren S. C. & Hyland M. E. (2000). What are the positive consequences of illness? Psychology and Health, 15:85-97.
  • Soosai-Nathan, L., & Delle Fave, A. (in press). The altruism spiral: an integrated model for a harmonious future. In H. Marujo, & L.M. Neto, (Eds.) Building positive nations and communities. Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Sundararajan, L. (2008). Towards a reflective Positive Psychology. Theory and Psychology, 18, 655-674.
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  • Steger M. F., Kawabata Y. Shimai S. & Otake K. (2008). The meaningful life in Japan and the United States: Levels and correlates of meaning in life. Journal of Research in Personality 42: 660-678.
  • Tafarodi, R.W, Bonn, G.,  Liang, H., Takai, J.,  Moriizumi, S., Belhekar, V., Padhye, A. (2012). What Makes for a Good Life? A Four-Nation Study. Journal of Happiness Studies, 12, 783-800.
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  • WHOQOL Group (2004). Can we identify the poorest quality of life? Assessing the importance of quality of life using the WHOQOL-100. Quality of Life Research, 13, 23-34.
  • Zautra, A., Stuart Hall J., & Murray, K.J. (2010). Resilience. A new definition of health for people and communities. In J.W.Reich, A.J.Zautra, & J. Stuart Hall Eds.) The Handbook of Adult Resilience (pp. 3-29). New York: The Guilford Press.

 

The Lecturer
Antonella Delle Fave, MD specialized in Clinical Psychology, is professor of Psychology at the Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy. Her studies research interests prominently concern optimal experience, the lifelong process of individual psychological selection, as well as the role of meanings and goal setting in individual and community development. Her specific attention to cultural diversity produced the largest international data bank on psychological selection and optimal experience. On the basis of research findings, she developed and supervised intervention projects in the domains of health and education, as well as international co-operation programs on disability and social maladjustment.

She has been collaborating with university research groups in the five continents. She actively contributed to the development and dissemination of positive psychology, as organizer of the 2nd European Positive Psychology Conference (Verbania, Italy, 2004) and founder of the Società Italiana di Psicologia Positiva. She was President of the European Network of Positive Psychology (ENPP) in 2006-2010, and President of the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) in 2009-2011.

She authored books, scientific articles, and chapters in peer-reviewed books. She is currently Editor in Chief of the Journal of Happiness Studies, and member of Editorial Boards and Boards of Reviewers of other scientific Journals in the domains of psychology and well-being. She is also Editor of two book series published by Springer: Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology Series, and Happiness Studies Series.

Her latest publication in English are:

  • Bassi, M., Delle Fave, A. (2010). Impact of extreme weather conditions on high-altitude climbers’ goals and quality of experience. Journal of Leisure Research, 3, 469-488.
  • Delle Fave, A. (2010). Development through disability: the unfolding and sharing of psychological resources. In G. W. Burns (Ed.), Happiness, healing and enhancement: your casebook collection for applying Positive Psychology in therapy (pp. 88-99). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Bassi, M., Sartori, R., Delle Fave, A. (2010). The monitoring of experience and agency in daily life: A study with Italian adolescents. In M. Balconi (Ed.), Neuropsychology of the sense of agency. From consciousness to action (pp.81-105). Springer Verlag Italia.
  • Bassi, M., Steca, P., Delle Fave, A. (2010). Academic self-efficacy beliefs and optimal experience: Merging perspectives in learning research. In R. Levesque (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Adolescence. Dordrecht, NL: Springer. DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-1695-2.
  • Delle Fave, A., Massimini, F., Bassi, M. (2011). Psychological selection and optimal experience across cultures. Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Steca, P., Bassi, M., Caprara, G.V., Delle Fave, A. (2011). Parents’ self-efficacy beliefs and their children’s psychosocial adaptation during adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40, 320-331.
  • Delle Fave A., Brdar I., Freire T., Vella-Brodrick D., & Wissing M.P. (2011). The Eudaimonic and hedonic components of happiness: qualitative and quantitative findings. Social Indicators Research, 100, 185-209.
  • Cortinovis., I., Luraschi, E., Intini, S., Sessa, M., & Delle Fave, A. (2011). The daily experience of people with achondroplasia. Applied Psychology: Health And Well-Being, 3 (2), 207–227.
  • Delle Fave, A., Fava, G.A. (2011). Positive psychotherapy and social change. In R. Biswas-Diener (Ed.). Positive Psychology  as  Social Change (pp. 267-292). Dordrecht: Springer Science.
  • Bassi M., Delle Fave A. (2012). Optimal experience and self-determination at school: Joining perspectives. Motivation and Emotion, 36, 425-438.
  • Bassi M., Delle Fave A. (2012). Optimal experience among teachers: new insights into the work paradox. The Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 146, 533-557
  • Bassi M., Ferrario N., Ba G., Delle Fave A., Viganò C. (2012). Quality of experience during psychosocial rehabilitation: a real-time investigation with Experience Sampling Method. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal.
  • Bassi M., Bacher G., Negri L., Delle Fave A. (2012). The contribution of Job Happiness and Job Meaning to the well-being of workers from thriving and failing companies. Applied Research in Quality of Life. DOI 10.1007/s11482-012-9202-x
  • Knoop, H.H., & Delle Fave, A. (2012). Positive Psychology and Cross-Cultural Research. In H.H. Knoop & A. Delle Fave (Eds.)., Well-being and Cultures: Perspectives from Positive Psychology  (pp.1-10). Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Delle Fave, A., Brdar, I., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Wissing, M. (2012). Religion, spirituality and well-being across nations: the Euadaimonic and hedonic Happiness Investigation. In H.H. Knoop & A. Delle Fave (Eds.)., Well-being and Cultures: Perspectives from Positive Psychology (pp.103-116). Dordrecht: Springer.
  • Delle Fave, A., Wissing, M. P., Brdar, I., Vella-Brodrick, D., & Freire, T. (2012). Perceived meaning and goals in adulthood: Their roots and relation with happiness. In A. Waterman (Ed.), The best within us: Positive Psychology Perspectives on Eudaimonic Functioning. Washington DC: American Psychological Association.
  • Bassi, M., Delle Fave, A. (2012). Leisure, optimal experience and psychological selection: Cultural and developmental perspectives. In T. Freire (Ed.), Positive leisure science: From subjective experience to social contexts. Dordrecht, NL: Springer.

 

Tags: Psychology, Social Psychology, Positive Psychology, Summer School, PhD
Published Dec. 3, 2012 11:21 AM - Last modified Sep. 22, 2015 12:43 PM