What are the major global threats and impacts in marine environments? Investigating the contours of a shared perception among marine scientists from the bottom-up

Boonstra, Wiebren; Ottosen, Katharina M.; Ferreira, Ana Sofia de Araújo; Richter, Andries Peter; Rogers, Lauren; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Kokkalis, Alexandros; Bárðarson, Hlynur; Bonanomi, Sara; Butler, William; Diekert, Florian Klaus; Fouzai, Nadia; Holma, Maija Kristiina; Holt, Rebecca; Kvile, Kristina Øie; Malanski, Evandro; Macdonald, Jed I.; Nieminen, Emmi Elina; Romagnoni, Giovanni; Snickars, Martin; Weigel, Benjamin; Woods, Pamela J.; Yletyinen, Johanna Katariina; Whittington, Jason

Elsevier Ltd

Photo: Elsevier Ltd

Published in:

Marine Policy, Volume 60, p. 197-201, October 2015

DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2015.06.007

 

Abstract:

Marine scientists broadly agree on which major processes influence the sustainability of marine environments worldwide. Recent studies argue that such shared perceptions crucially shape scientific agendas and are subject to a confirmation bias. Based on these findings a more explicit engagement with scientists’ (shared) perceptions of global change in marine environments is called for. This paper takes stock of the shared understanding in marine science of the most pertinent, worldwide threats and impacts that currently affect marine environments. Using results from an email survey among leading academics in marine science this article explores if a shared research agenda in relation to global change in marine environments exists. The analysis demonstrates that marine scientists across disciplines are largely in agreement on some common features of global marine change. Nevertheless, the analysis also highlights where natural and social scientists diverge in their assessment. The article ends discussing what these findings imply for further improvement of interdisciplinary marine science.

 

Published July 12, 2016 2:18 PM - Last modified July 13, 2016 2:25 PM