Tracing scientisation in the EU Commission’s expert group system

Eva Krick and Åse Gornitzka have published an article in Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, tracing the claim of a “scientisation” of EU governance.

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Abstract

This study traces the sweeping claim of a “scientisation” of EU governance, that is a growing authority of research-based knowledge within modern policymaking, by zooming in on the EU Commission’s expert group system, and its “high level groups” in particular. With new quantitative and qualitative data that cover the period between 2005 and 2017, the study assesses whether alleged scientisation pressures are translated into actual patterns of participation and into modes of committee governance, and how this has changed over time. The study does not find signs of a substantial scientisation of the membership structure and this contrasts with the numbers of the official expert group register. Nonetheless, the considerable authority of epistemic claims seems to leave its mark on the management of the expert group system, i.e. the groups’ mandate framings, the selection of chairpersons and committee member labelling practices.

Full info

Eva Krick and Åse Gornitzka
Tracing scientisation in the EU Commission’s expert group system

Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, 2020
DOI: 10.1080/13511610.2020.1811649

Tags: scientisation, expertisation, Expert Role, European Commission, governance
Published Sep. 9, 2020 3:16 PM - Last modified Sep. 9, 2020 3:16 PM