Representation through deliberation: The European case

This paper shows that the main pattern of European democratisation has unfolded along the lines of an EU organised as a multilevel system of representative parliamentary government and not as a system of deliberative governance as the transnationalists propound.

ARENA Working Paper 5/2011 (pdf)

Erik Oddvar Eriksen and John Erik Fossum

This paper shows that the main pattern of European democratisation has unfolded along the lines of an EU organised as a multilevel system of representative parliamentary government and not as a system of deliberative governance as the transnationalists propound. But the multilevel EU has developed a structure of representation that is theoretically challenging. In order to come to grips with this we present an institutional variant of deliberative theory, which understands democracy as the combination of a principle of justification and an organisational form. It comes with the following explanatory mechanisms: claimsmaking, justification and learning which in the EU also program institutional copying and emulation mechanisms. We show that the EU has established an incomplete system of representative democracy steeped in a distinct representation-deliberation interface, which has emerged through a particular and distinct configuration of democratisation mechanisms.

This paper was first published as RECON Online Working Paper 2011/14

It was pre-printed by permission of the journal. It was later published in Constellations, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2012.

Tags: Deliberative Democracy, Democratisation, European Parliament, Institutions, Legitimacy, Political Science
Published June 21, 2011 2:44 PM - Last modified Apr. 25, 2016 10:50 AM