Purity is Danger: Ambiguities of Touch around Sickness and Death in Western Kenya

In their article, Purity is Danger: Ambiguities of Touch around Sickness and Death in Western Kenya, Ruth J. Prince and Paul W.Geissler are giving us a view from a Luo-speaking village in western Kenya. HIV/AIDS reached epidemic propotions in western Kenya, and bodily suffering and death were widely shared experiences. Through the stories of a married daughter and her elderly father, who died within few months from one another we experience what is commonly referred to as "the death of today".

The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has been addressed and perceived predominantly through the broad perspectives of social and economic theories as well as public health and development discourses. This volume however, focuses on the micro-politics of illness, treatment and death in order to offer innovative insights into the complex processes that shape individual and community responses to AIDS. The contributions describe the dilemmas that families, communities and health professionals face and shed new light on the transformation of social and moral orders in African societies, which have been increasingly marginalised in the context of global modernity.
 

Emneord: Chira, HIV/AIDS, Lulo Rules, Sickness, Sociality, Uhero Av Alf Jensen
Publisert 26. aug. 2010 15:00 - Sist endret 11. jan. 2011 13:10