Ethnographies returned: The mobilization of ethnographies and the politicisation of indigeneity in Ifugao, the Philippines

Jon Henrik Ziegler Remme discusses how Ifugao indigenous religion is influenced by earlier ethnographic descriptions.

Publishers presentation

How do ethnography and ethnographers contribute to shaping indigenous religions? This question guides Jon Henrik Ziegler Remme’s recent article “Ethnographies returned: The mobilisation of ethnographies and the politicisation of indigeneity in Ifugao, the Philippines”, published in the edited volume Handbook of Indigenous Religion(s). Remme discusses how the work of previous ethnographers in the Philippine highlands influence on people’s own views of what Ifugao indigenous religion is and should be. By attending to the variety of ways in which these ethnographies were appropriated in indigenous identity politics, in local museums and cultural festivals, Remme demonstrates how ethnography and ethnographers were drawn upon to both enhance the political impact force of indigeneity and to disarticulate indigeneity from politics.

Published Aug. 25, 2017 11:41 AM - Last modified Aug. 25, 2017 11:41 AM