A history of the term “DMARD”

In this article, published in Inflammopharmacology - Experimental and Therapeutic Studies, Jonas Kure Buer outlines a history of the drug category, from the emergence in the 1970s of the idea of drugs with decisive long-term effects on bone-erosion in rheumatoid arthritis, through the consolidation and popularisation of the term DMARD 1980s and 1990s.

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The last 30-40 years have seen the appearance of a heterogeneous class of antirheumatic drugs, unified by the assumption that they are able to alter the long-term, destructive course of arthritic disease. The term dominantly used to refer to these drugs have been "disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs" or "DMARDs". Since the turn of the century, the introduction of the so-called "biological" DMARDs has revolutionized rheumatological treatment, and their manufacture has developed into one of the most profitable niches in pharmacology.

In this article, Jonas Kure Buer outlines a history of the drug category, from the emergence in the 1970s of the idea of drugs with decisive long-term effects on bone-erosion in rheumatoid arthritis, through the consolidation and popularisation of the term DMARD 1980s and 1990s. He then examines the usage of the terms "remission-inducing drugs" (RIDs) and "slow-acting anti-rheumatic drugs" (SAARDs), which for some years offered competition to the term DMARDs, underscoring the contingency of the establishment of DMARD as a word. Finally, he juxtaposes the apparently spontaneous emergence of the three terms DMARD, SAARD and RID, and the disappearance of the latter two, with a failed attempt in the early 1990s to replace these terms with the new term “disease-controlling antirheumatic treatment” (DC-ART).

The article, published in Inflammopharmacology - Experimental and Therapeutic Studies, is a continuation of Jonas Kure Buer's earlier work on drug classes.

 

 

Published July 29, 2015 11:25 AM - Last modified July 29, 2015 2:17 PM