Research news - Page 3

Published Oct. 3, 2014 7:52 PM

Learn from Caribbeans and see the world as many small interconnected islands that can only exist as a whole, says Kristian Van Haesendonck, who will speak at the next Overheating-seminar.

Published Sep. 27, 2014 5:14 PM

40 years ago it was an insignificant fishing village, now Macaé is Brazil’s bustling oil capital. While the oil rush is widely celebrated, both the favelas of the poor and the gated communities of the rich are growing, says Caroline Inglingstad.

Published Sep. 17, 2014 7:23 PM

​Even deep in the Amazon jungle people feel the consequences of global economic policies. In Peru, Margrethe Steinert is studying how the Asháninka indigenous people deal with mining companies, migrants and the neoliberal state.

The conditions for change towards a more sustainable life are currently not be the best. Alliances between politicians and corporations overrun local communities. Here from a march in Canberra, 2014. Photo: David Burke, flickr
Published Sep. 2, 2014 8:46 PM

When mining sites, shipyards and power plants are built in their neighborhoods, many locals feel they have no say in it. – When big money is involved, politics tends to become less democratic. The slogan is no longer ‘people first’, but ‘money first’, Thomas Hylland Eriksen said at the largest gathering of anthropologists in Europe.

Published Aug. 13, 2014 8:30 PM

Corsica is perfectly suited for organic farming. But the growing tourism industry has turned arable land into housing estates. Young people are unsuccessfully looking for farm land, says anthropologist Marie Stormo Nilsson.

Published July 29, 2014 2:56 PM

Fair prices, better working conditions, security: It is supposed to be a solution to economic injustice. But in the tiny Caribbean island Dominica, more and more banana farmers are leaving Fair Trade, tells Frida Aamnes.

Published June 18, 2014 12:24 PM

Lack of energy not only harms businesses in Nepal, but also contributes to new class divides, pollution and migration to richer countries.

Published June 2, 2014 4:08 PM

How to collaborate in a research project when your collegues are spread across five continents? Email? Skype? Facebook? The Overheating-team found something intellectually more rewarding.

Published May 27, 2014 1:25 PM

Do old civilizational traditions still play a role in economic life today? In a new project, Overheating researcher Chris Hann wants to show that so-called civilizational analysis can give us new insights into the current political and economic crises - and maybe also solutions.

Published Apr. 24, 2014 1:30 PM

Ten years after the civil war, life has come back to Lunsar in Sierra Leone. Anthropologist Robert Pijpers is talking with CEOs and motortaxi drivers about the current mining boom, the influx of new people and investments, and about the resettlement of entire villages.

Published Mar. 10, 2014 3:47 PM

What are the side effects of extracting oil in the Canadian tar sands areas? – Before I came to Canada, I thought the environmental crisis was the most urgent. But I cannot say this anymore, says anthropologist Lena Gross.

Published Feb. 10, 2014 1:27 PM

Tensions are high in Subic Bay in the Philippines. The costs of Labour are among the lowest in Southeast Asia – something more and more foreign investors have come to exploit, says Elisabeth Schober, who is currently on fieldwork there.

Published Jan. 30, 2014 7:42 AM

How do you promote creativity in the workplace? The architects at Snøhetta use magic. This is something more companies should aim for, says anthropologist Aina Landsverk Hagen.

Published Jan. 21, 2014 2:57 PM

People in Colca Valley are organizing forums to discuss climate change, food security and a controversial dam and irrigation project, says Astrid Bredholt Stensrud, currently on fieldwork in the Peruvian Andes.

Published Jan. 21, 2014 11:46 AM

If we want to move towards ecological sustainability, we cannot ignore the life-worlds of people who make their living in the fossil fuel industry, says Thomas Hylland Eriksen, currently on fieldwork in the industrial town of Gladstone in Australia.

Published Jan. 16, 2014 9:11 AM

It has taken us several hundred million years to produce this compressed sunlight, and it has been the driving force of modern civilization for two hundred years. It cannot be eliminated without further ado, writes Thomas Hylland Eriksen.

Published Jan. 8, 2014 4:25 PM

Elephants clashing with human beings on their paddy fields, people dying from kidney failure, climatic uncertainty, increased jealousy leading to sorcery attacks, and the nearing end of small-scale farming: Results of a global crisis of desire?

Published Nov. 21, 2013 3:26 PM

China’s economic growth does not always benefit its national minorities. Instead, it strains ethnic relations.

Published Oct. 15, 2013 8:30 PM

A discipline that is obsessed with cultural differences will be nothing but a burden to humanity, says Ronald Stade who is researching human waste and humans as waste in Ghana’s largest slum.

Published Sep. 25, 2013 10:50 AM

Social anthropologists are not only crossing disciplinary boundaries. They have also started studying other species.

Published Sep. 16, 2013 12:30 AM

Thomas Hylland Eriksen is getting ready for fieldwork close to The Great Barrier Reef that may be about to become a victim of Australia’s economic growth.

Published Sep. 9, 2013 2:08 AM

Our models for learning are inadequate. To solve humanity’s biggest crises we have to learn how to learn together in new ways, says Fred Steier who will be holding the next Overheating seminar.

Published Sep. 4, 2013 1:34 PM

More specific knowledge is not always the most imporant thing. What we really need is to train our mind to think outside the box. That's the aim of the second Bateson symposium at the University of Oslo, 11-12 september.

Published Aug. 21, 2013 4:30 PM

Research in the zoo about the origins of human cooperation can be relevant for understanding the economic crisis. Also “the harder sciences” can contribute to less inequality in our world, says Chris Hann, the new Professor II at the Overheating project.

Published Aug. 17, 2013 1:00 AM

What happens when international companies develop large-scale projects in poor rural areas in Sierra Leone? How do people respond to the changes? Who gains and who loses? That’s what anthropologist Robert Pijpers wants to find out.