News - Page 4

Published Mar. 10, 2014 3:47 PM

What are the side effects of extracting oil in the Canadian tar sands areas? – Before I came to Canada, I thought the environmental crisis was the most urgent. But I cannot say this anymore, says anthropologist Lena Gross.

Published Feb. 10, 2014 4:38 PM

In retrospect, it is easy to see that the opening of the Stuart Shale Oil plant was the beginning of the end for Targinnie as a living rural community.

Published Feb. 10, 2014 1:27 PM

Tensions are high in Subic Bay in the Philippines. The costs of Labour are among the lowest in Southeast Asia – something more and more foreign investors have come to exploit, says Elisabeth Schober, who is currently on fieldwork there.

Published Jan. 30, 2014 7:42 AM

How do you promote creativity in the workplace? The architects at Snøhetta use magic. This is something more companies should aim for, says anthropologist Aina Landsverk Hagen.

Published Jan. 27, 2014 10:31 AM

In Sierra Leone, as well as in many developing and resource rich countries in the world, there is an increasingly important debate regarding local content: the use of local products and services by foreign investors.

Published Jan. 22, 2014 12:30 PM

The only way to leave Lac La Biche other than by private car are the overland buses. On some days they don’t show up, on some they are way too early, on most days they are late.

Published Jan. 21, 2014 2:57 PM

People in Colca Valley are organizing forums to discuss climate change, food security and a controversial dam and irrigation project, says Astrid Bredholt Stensrud, currently on fieldwork in the Peruvian Andes.

Published Jan. 21, 2014 11:46 AM

If we want to move towards ecological sustainability, we cannot ignore the life-worlds of people who make their living in the fossil fuel industry, says Thomas Hylland Eriksen, currently on fieldwork in the industrial town of Gladstone in Australia.

Published Jan. 16, 2014 9:11 AM

It has taken us several hundred million years to produce this compressed sunlight, and it has been the driving force of modern civilization for two hundred years. It cannot be eliminated without further ado, writes Thomas Hylland Eriksen.

Published Jan. 8, 2014 4:25 PM

Elephants clashing with human beings on their paddy fields, people dying from kidney failure, climatic uncertainty, increased jealousy leading to sorcery attacks, and the nearing end of small-scale farming: Results of a global crisis of desire?

Published Jan. 8, 2014 10:55 AM

A little while ago, I caught fifty slimy amphibians with my bare hands, put them into a sack and promptly delivered them to be killed in an industrial-sized freezer. My usually peaceful and animal-friendly self felt surprisingly pleased with itself for carrying out this act, which was intended to protect the lives of other animals.

Published Dec. 19, 2013 1:54 PM

Many things have changed in Chivay, but at the same time, it feels like it have just been a couple of days since I left.

Published Dec. 13, 2013 11:40 AM

Wherever there is change, there also seems to be disappointment.

Published Dec. 5, 2013 1:29 PM

‘It is the ugliest town in Australia; I think you should go there.’

Published Nov. 21, 2013 3:26 PM

China’s economic growth does not always benefit its national minorities. Instead, it strains ethnic relations.

Published Oct. 23, 2013 2:25 PM

On my 5th day in Subic Bay, we found a dead pig on the shore, buried in sand all the way up to its snout. The stray dogs had not gotten to it yet, and there was no smell, either. Just the sad, solemn sight of this animal that had been caught by the water, carried off into the sea, and then washed ashore on our beach. I could not stop staring at it, wondering about the people it had belonged to before its sudden death by drowning.

Published Oct. 15, 2013 8:30 PM

A discipline that is obsessed with cultural differences will be nothing but a burden to humanity, says Ronald Stade who is researching human waste and humans as waste in Ghana’s largest slum.

Published Sep. 25, 2013 10:50 AM

Social anthropologists are not only crossing disciplinary boundaries. They have also started studying other species.

Published Sep. 16, 2013 12:30 AM

Thomas Hylland Eriksen is getting ready for fieldwork close to The Great Barrier Reef that may be about to become a victim of Australia’s economic growth.

Published Sep. 9, 2013 2:08 AM

Our models for learning are inadequate. To solve humanity’s biggest crises we have to learn how to learn together in new ways, says Fred Steier who will be holding the next Overheating seminar.

Published Sep. 4, 2013 1:34 PM

More specific knowledge is not always the most imporant thing. What we really need is to train our mind to think outside the box. That's the aim of the second Bateson symposium at the University of Oslo, 11-12 september.

Published Aug. 21, 2013 4:30 PM

Research in the zoo about the origins of human cooperation can be relevant for understanding the economic crisis. Also “the harder sciences” can contribute to less inequality in our world, says Chris Hann, the new Professor II at the Overheating project.

Published Aug. 17, 2013 1:00 AM

What happens when international companies develop large-scale projects in poor rural areas in Sierra Leone? How do people respond to the changes? Who gains and who loses? That’s what anthropologist Robert Pijpers wants to find out.

Published July 29, 2013 6:06 AM

Why has water increasingly become a source of trouble and conflict? Why is the driest continent on earth one of the world’s biggest water exporters? – I am interested in the drivers of overheating, says anthropologist Veronica Strang.

Published July 16, 2013 2:22 PM

They chained themselves to bridges and went on hungerstrike. What people wanted was a road that connects them to the wider world. – Roads are perfect spaces for studying connections and crises, says anthropologist Penny Harvey.