News - Page 2

Published Dec. 2, 2015 8:30 AM

Marianne E. Lien has been interviewed for an article that focuses on salmon's identity crisis in the science magazine Nautilus.

Read the full article Is Farmed Salmon Really Salmon? The staple fish is having an identity crisis.

Published Nov. 3, 2015 6:07 PM

Why has the largest man-made structure on earth, until recently, been a landfill? Are waste pickers environmental heroes, or is their work first and foremost inhuman? Do we treat some humans the same way we treat waste?

Published Oct. 30, 2015 2:24 PM

Premysl Macha, Ph.D. from the University of Ostrava, Czech Republic will be on a research stay at the Department of Social Anthropology, from 9. -13. of November 2015.​

Sami representative at the UN World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in New York
Published Oct. 12, 2015 3:56 PM

Globalisation provides the Sami people with political power as well as valuable networks with indigenous people worldwide. "Globalisation has been really positive for the Sami political struggle," says Maria Hernes, who recently returned from fieldwork in Karasjok, Oslo, and New York.

Kiruna is home to the world's largest underground iron ore mine
Published Sep. 12, 2015 9:14 AM

International media are celebrating the corporate-led relocation of Kiruna. Anthropologist Elisa Maria Lopez thinks it is important to talk about “forced displacement” and “chronic uncertainty” in the northernmost Swedish town instead.

Ritual to obtain blessings from the local deity to ensure health and well-being of the one-year olds
Published Sep. 7, 2015 3:13 PM

Does health constitute another major crisis of globalisation? How does food relate to health, well-being, and social change? Wim Van Daele has talked with healers and doctors in Sri Lanka about the “unhealthy” mix of new and processed foods, stress, the corporate monopolization of food chains, and burning stomachs.

Published Aug. 20, 2015 11:23 AM

Over the course of just a few years, salmon farming has become one of Norway's most important industries. Yet we know little about the salmon. New research raises the fish to its rightful place as one of Norway’s most important livestock.

Published Aug. 13, 2015 4:17 PM

As the number of new ebola cases decreases in Sierra Leone, the west African country can now start looking to the future.

The ebola crisis, which started in March 2014, saw more than 13,000 people infected and left almost 4000 dead in the country. Trade became difficult, household costs rose sharply and many jobs were lost.

Published July 27, 2015 7:58 PM

Pollution, violence, forced displacement: What to do against harmful side effects of mining? A big disaster on a small island helped anthropologist Catherine Coumans to find an answer.

Mosque in Buenos Aires
Published July 9, 2015 1:06 AM

“In Europe, we too quickly link the idea of converting to Islam with radicalization. Such discourses are much less common here. There is much less fear of Islam than in many European countries,” says Tiffany Linn Utvær Gasser, currently on fieldwork in Buenos Aires.

Published July 7, 2015 12:10 PM

More temporary contracts, more flexible positions, and many people without paid jobs at all. The way we think about labour can be about to change, according to anthropologists.

Published June 24, 2015 11:12 AM

Wim van Daele is in Sri Lanka, and has been using Ayurvedic learning to understand how a complex interplay of hot foods, stress, fertilizers, inactivity, changed temporalities, and acceleration of life is leading to gastritis and other digestive problems - in short, an Overheating of the human body.

Published June 9, 2015 10:28 AM

What can explain the success of UKIP (United Kingdom Independence Party) that with it´s hard Eurosceptic and anti-immigration message has emerged as the most significant political force in post-war Britain? To find out, Postdoc Cathrine Moe Thorleifsson has travelled to Doncaster town in South Yorkshire, a UKIP hotspot. 

Published May 22, 2015 7:09 PM

​Coal for power, iron ore for steel girders, minerals for our smart phones: the mining business is booming. More and more anthropologists are uncovering effects of this development that would otherwise risk falling under the radar.

Iceland has cheap and environmentally friendly power because the volcanic activity that formed the island 50 million years ago still provides an important natural resource. Photo: Gunnuhver geothermal area, by Carsten ten Brink, flickr
Published May 13, 2015 4:59 PM

Why has Iceland, a country that is famous for its abundant renewable energy, started to engage in oil exploitation? Other countries are moving away from fossil fuels. Why is this volcanic island choosing the opposite path and will it be worth it, master student Pernille Ihme wonders, currently on fieldwork in northeastern Iceland.

How do borders affect people's lives? Photo: Sara Prestianni, Noborders Network, flickr
Published Apr. 24, 2015 3:26 AM

News about sinking boats carrying African migrants as they attempt to reach Europe is shaking the public. Similar dramas are unfolding regularly in Melilla, where Gard Ringen Høibjerg is currently on fieldwork.

Published Apr. 7, 2015 8:15 PM

Economic crises can lead to a rise in xenophobia. But the opposite can also be true. At the next Overheating seminar, anthropologist Theodoros Rakopoulos will talk about the thriving solidarity economy in Greece.

Published Mar. 29, 2015 3:26 AM

Instead of reviewing laws and policies in their offices, bureaucrats tour the country, hold public meetings and communicate with citizens via social media. An initiative in Tanzania can serve as example for other countries wishing to revive local democracy and expand their political and legal repertoire, believes anthropologist Knut Christian Myhre, who is currently writing a book on the topic.

Published Mar. 22, 2015 2:32 PM

Would you like to influence policies on climate change, oil drilling, war, and peace? More and more corporations and foreign governments are convinced that creating a think tank is the way to go. But the power of think tanks is more fragile than is generally assumed, as anthropologist Christina Garsten learned during her fieldwork.

Why all those dying fish? Because of a recent flooding or industrial activities? Photo: Greens MPs, flickr
Published Mar. 9, 2015 4:30 PM

"Who pays for your research? Who benefits from a particular version of reality? These questions should be raised time and again to get a better vantage-point for acting upon an overheated world,” says Thomas Hylland Eriksen after having studied an environmental scandal in Australia.

Published Feb. 24, 2015 9:32 AM

Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Henrik Sinding-Larsen from Overheating have received funding from the Norwegian Research Council to organise a conference on sustainability.

Published Feb. 19, 2015 9:02 AM

Zdenka Sokolíčková Ph.D. M.A. from the Czech Republic will be on a research stay at the Department of Social Anthropology, from 23 February – 8 March 2015.​

Published Feb. 13, 2015 10:27 AM

How does global capitalism influence our relations with other people and our perceptions of who we are? How do people cope with rapid changes in their surroundings? Which roles can researchers play in times of change and conflict?

Published Feb. 13, 2015 9:34 AM

A Superman cartoon was able to bring some movement to the polarized immigration debate. What can social scientists learn from this?

Screenshot from Andrea Wise's art project Returned with pictures of deported migrants in Cape Verde
Published Jan. 20, 2015 10:40 PM

When Jacky was deported from the USA to Cape Verde, his life came to a sudden standstill. Within a short time his face grew deep wrinkles; it looked resigned, exhausted, and drained. Merely at his age of 45, Jacky looked like an old man.