Integrational transmission of age at first birth in Norway

Birgitte Sande Riise, Lars Dommermuth and Torkild Hovde Lyngstad assess the extent of intergenerational transmission using discrete-time event history analysis, and estimate associations between the age at first birth of parents and their children.

Abstract

Using data from administrative registers, we examine the intergenerational transmission of timing of first birth in Norway for all men and women born between 1954 and 1964. We assess the extent of any intergenerational transmission using discrete-time event history analysis, and estimate associations between the age at first birth of parents and their children. Results suggest that intergenerational transmission of age at first birth is evident in all four parent–child dyads and at all ages of the first-birth process. This means that even in a society as contemporary Norway, with a welfare state that offers a range of universal social benefits, own fertility timing is correlated with parents’ fertility behavior. Furthermore, our analyses indicate that fathers’ high age at first birth is closely associated with postponed birth of sons. Results from a microsimulation suggest that the fertility timing of daughters is less malleable by changes in parental age at birth than the fertility timing of sons. Controlling for a limited set of possible confounders, we find that the intergenerational transmission of age at first birth largely persist.

 

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Emneord: Intergenerational transmission, fertility, first birth, education, parent–child dyads, Norway Av Riise, Birgitte Sande; Dommermuth, Lars; Lyngstad Torkild Hove
Publisert 9. mai 2017 16:09 - Sist endret 10. mai 2017 10:23