Attitudes toward alcohol-related sickness absence and presenteeism: differences across subgroups of the population?

Line Schou, Inger Synnøve Moan and Elisabeth Storvoll maps employees’ attitudes toward alcohol-related sickness absence and presenteeism and examine how these attitudes vary across subgroups of the population.

Abstract

More knowledge is needed to understand costly behaviors such as absence from work or reduced efficiency at work due to alcohol.

The aim of this study was: (i) to map employees’ attitudes toward alcohol-related sickness absence and presenteeism and (ii) to examine how these attitudes vary across subgroups of the population.

Methods: Data stem from a web-survey among 18–69 year old Norwegians (N = 1407). The respondents evaluated six situations with alcohol-related sickness absence and presenteeism. The employees’ own drinking habits, alcohol-related sickness absence, and presenteeism were mapped.

Results: Attitudes toward alcohol-related absence were more restrictive than attitudes toward presenteeism. Both behaviors were condemned more strongly with frequent occurrence. Employees with a high intoxication frequency and/or own experience with these behaviors were more tolerant. Women were less tolerant of alcohol-related absence than men, and employees with a higher educational level were less tolerant of alcohol-related presenteeism than those with a low educational level. The other variables were not significant controlled for all other variables.

Conclusion: Alcohol-related sickness absence and presenteeism are generally not tolerated among Norwegian employees, unless it occurs very infrequently. Employees who were frequently intoxicated and who reported having had alcohol-related absence and presenteeism themselves were more tolerant.

 

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Av Schou, Line; Moan, Inger Synnøve; Storvoll, Elisabet
Publisert 9. mai 2017 16:22 - Sist endret 10. mai 2017 10:22