Europe's Immigration Challenge

Grete Brochmann and Elena Jurado are the editors of a new book about European immigration policy. In this book, leading immigration experts question the effectiveness of countries selecting immigrants on the basis of national interests. Besides efforts to regulate the flow and rights of immigrants, they argue that governments across Europe need to devise labour market, welfare and immigration policies in a more integrated fashion.

Learn more at http://www.ibtauris.com/

As the financial crisis continues to cast its long shadow over Europe, the view that immigrants compete unfairly for jobs and present an unsustainable burden on the European Social Model appears to be gathering support in some circles. But at the same time, the 'right' type of immigrant has often been perceived as a potential cure for Europe's sluggish labour markets and ailing welfare systems - especially immigrants who are young, easily employable and who arrive without family. So far, efforts to solve this conundrum - as in the UK's points-based system - have focused on increasing the selectivity of the admissions process. In this book, leading immigration experts question the effectiveness of this approach. Besides efforts to regulate the flow and rights of immigrants, they argue that governments across Europe need to devise labour market, welfare and immigration policies in a more integrated fashion.

 

EXTRACT  - Download a feature essay by the editors setting-out and introducing the key arguments in PDF form here.

Published Feb. 28, 2013 12:57 PM - Last modified Oct. 26, 2016 2:48 PM