Oslo Summer School in Comparative Social Science Studies 2018

Psychoanalysis is not what you think: Subjectivity, history and psychosocial studies

Professor Ian Parker, Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester, UK

Course dates: 23 - 27 July 2018

Application procedures

Main disciplines: Psychology, Psychoanalysis,
Critical Psychology, Social and Political Theory

Course Credits: 10 pts (ECTS)
Limitation: 25 participants


Objectives and learning outcome
This course explores the development and present-day practice of psychoanalysis through autobiographical narrative which illuminates the internal shape of a phenomenon over time. I trace a journey through psychoanalysis and my work as an analyst. In this case, the phenomenon, psychoanalysis, is treated as a series of theoretical frameworks and practices of language.

Psychoanalysis is one of the rhetorical disciplines in the human sciences, attending to the speech of the ‘analysand’ – the psychoanalytic patient – and opening a space in their lives in which they may speak well. The lectures travel through different versions of psychoanalysis, making an argument for the importance of language, culture and history in its theory and practice.


Course format
Each session will consist of a 35-minute lecture taking us through a stage in the process of encountering the psy-complex. After each lecture, students are invited to participate in a discussion focusing on the narrative and on the readings and to share their own experiences and reflections on the topic.


Readings
The course traces a narrative which will lead us to reflect on issues raised in the following sources which you should consult before the course:

  • Bettelheim, B. (1986) Freud and Man’s Soul, Harmondsworth: Pelican.
  • Gordo, A. and De Vos (eds) (2010) Psychologisation Under Scrutiny, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 8, https://discourseunit.com/annual-review/8-2010/
  • Owens, C. (ed.) (2009) Lacan and Critical Psychology, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 7, https://discourseunit.com/annual-review/7-2009/
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Psychoanalysis: Psychosocial studies and beyond. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After the Unconscious: From Freud to Lacan. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Lacan: Connecting the clinic and research. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


LECTURE OUTLINE

Day 1, 23 July 2018, morning

Session 1: In which we ask why psychoanalysis is much misunderstood, explore some of the reasons to avoid it, and discover that there are many reasons to take it seriously. The first day of the course focuses on the reasons why we avoid psychoanalysis.


Session 2: In which I describe how difficult it is to square the misrepresentation of Freud as a psychologist with some of the critical discussions of psychoanalysis from within feminism, in which there are many other good reasons to avoid analysis, and with the alternative Marxist reading of Freud.


Day 1, 23 July 2018, afternoon

Session 3: In which we look at some of the attempts to put psychoanalysis to work, and discover that there are deep divisions in the history of the psychoanalytic movement.


Session 4: In which we look at how psychoanalysis is taught in the university, and the way that rationalist models of the mind draw us close to particular problematic versions of psychoanalytic theory.

Reading:

  • Bettelheim, B. (1986) Freud and Man’s Soul, Harmondsworth: Pelican.
  • Millet, K. (1977) Sexual Politics. London: Virago.
  • Mitchell, J. (1974) Psychoanalysis and Feminism, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Psychoanalysis: Psychosocial studies and beyond. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


Day 2, 24 July 2018, morning

Session 5: In which we explore some of the attractions of psychoanalytic ideas, and the way they provide explanations for social processes, such as threat and defence. The second day of the course focuses on ways in which we encounter psychoanalysis.


Session 6: In which we try to make sense of competing approaches to group and individual psychotherapy in the British National Health Service, and show how psychoanalytic ideas needed to adapt themselves to health institutions in order to survive.


Day 2, 24 July 2018, afternoon

Session 7: In which we trace how people might find psychoanalysts, what the process of discovering, and settling into psychoanalytic treatment might look like, and we reflect on how our knowledge of psychoanalysis, our suppositions about the theory and what analysis entails, leads us to certain kinds of analysts.


Session 8: In which it becomes clear that psychoanalysis as clinical treatment is closely connected with psychoanalysis as a form of research, and equally clear that this raises a host of questions about how it should be taught and how its own practice should be studied.

Reading

  • Frosh, S. (2002) After Words: The Personal in Gender, Culture and Psychotherapy. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Kovel, J. (1983) Against the State of Nuclear Terror. London: Pan.
  • Madsen, O. J. (2014) The Therapeutic Turn: How Psychology Altered Western Culture. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After the Unconscious: From Freud to Lacan. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


Day 3, 25 July 2018, morning

Session 9: In which we puzzle over the question as to which of two training options in psychoanalysis in the 1990s – Group Analysis and Lacanian Analysis – might provide the most thoroughly ‘social’ approach to personal experience and treatment. The third day of the course focuses on the training of psychoanalysts.


Session 10: In which we trace the development of Freud’s differential diagnosis of neuroses, psychosis and perversion from psychiatry through to present-day psychoanalytic practice, and explore some of the dilemmas this poses for those who turn to analysis as an alternative to mainstream ‘labels’ for behaviour and experience.


Day 3, 25 July 2018, afternoon

Session 11: In which we look at how long-standing rivalries in the psychoanalytic movement – between followers of Freud and followers of Jung – continue to frame present-day debates over the roles of culture and memory, and the role of personal analysis in psychoanalytic training.


Session 12: In which we describe the institutional processes that must be navigated in order for the psychoanalyst to find ‘analysands’, first patients who might thereby function for training purposes and provide experience of what it is to listen to another person speak and what it is to reflect on what happens in supervision of the practice.

Reading

  • Dunker, C. (2010) The Structure and Constitution of the Psychoanalytic Clinic: Negativity and Conflict in Contemporary Practice. London: Karnac.
  • Kovel, J. (1981) The Age of Desire: Case Histories of a Radical Psychoanalyst. New York: Pantheon.
  • O’Connor, N. and Ryan, J. (1993) Wild Desires and Mistaken Identities: Lesbianism and Psychoanalysis. London: Virago.
  • Parker, I. and Revelli, S. (eds) (2008) Psychoanalytic Practice and State Regulation. London: Karnac.


Day 4, 26 July 2018, morning

Session 13: In which we go deeper into some of the theoretical underpinnings of contemporary psychoanalytic work, but do this by examining the role of the Slavoj Žižek and the impact of social theory. The fourth day of the course focuses on attempts to ‘apply’ psychoanalysis.


Session 14: In which we explore the question as to whether psychoanalysis as a treatment of individuals can be ‘applied’ to groups, institutions and societies in relation to psychoanalytic conceptions of trauma and the ‘chosen trauma’ of particular social groups.


Day 4, 26 July 2018, afternoon

Session 15: In which we trace the cultural-historical conditions for psychoanalysis to exist, looking at underlying assumptions about the self and others in central and Western Europe, and describing the ways in which different versions of psychoanalysis have taken root in Japan.


Session 16: In which we examine the way that psychoanalytic ideas have been put into practice outside the clinic, focusing on the cultural-political work of art collectives in Slovenia that employed notions of transference and ‘overidentification’ to challenge the regime, a challenge that then inspired some of the new theoretical movements inside psychoanalysis.

Reading

  • Kovel, J. (1988) The Radical Spirit: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Society. London: Free Association Books.
  • Parker, I. (2004) Slavoj Žižek: A Critical Introduction. London: Pluto Press.
  • Parker, I. (2008) Japan in Analysis: Cultures of the Unconscious. London: Palgrave.
  • Parker, I. and Pavón-Cuéllar, D. (eds) (2014) Lacan, Discourse, Event: New Psychoanalytic Approaches to Textual Indeterminacy. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


Day 5, 27 July 2018, morning

Session 17: In which we reflect on the nature of psychoanalytic discourse as a way of speaking about the unconscious, and explore the temptation of turning psychoanalysis itself into a worldview. This fifth day of the course focuses on the limits and question of the end of psychoanalysis.


Session 18: In which we expand the scope of our study of psychoanalysis to describe some contemporary debates and tensions inside the psychoanalytic movement throughout the world, over the role of the family and sexuality, and over the many different governmental attempts to confine and regulate training and practice.


Day 5, 27 July 2018, afternoon

Session 19: In which we home in on one particular manifestation of the questions of psychoanalysis as a worldview, its commitment to secular democracy and scientific reason. We explore the role of Judaism and antisemitism in the history of psychoanalysis, and of attempts to acknowledge the impact of a ‘third wave’ of cultural adaptation, to Islam.


Session 20: In which we focus on the current crisis of ethics and abuse in professional training institutions, including in psychoanalysis, reviewing the recent attempts by system-survivor and service-user activists to connect with professionals in order to provide versions of psychoanalysis that are free rather than restricted to the realm of private treatment.

Reading

  • Danto, E. A. (2005) Freud’s Free Clinics: Psychoanalysis and Social Justice, 1918-1938. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • De Vos, J. (2012) Psychologisation in Times of Globalisation. London: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2011) Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Revolutions in Subjectivity. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Lacan: Connecting the clinic and research. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


Bibliography

  • Danto, E. A. (2005) Freud’s Free Clinics: Psychoanalysis and Social Justice, 1918-1938. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • De Vos, J. (2012) Psychologisation in Times of Globalisation. London: Routledge.
  • Dunker, C. (2010) The Structure and Constitution of the Psychoanalytic Clinic: Negativity and Conflict in Contemporary Practice. London: Karnac.
  • Frosh, S. (2002) After Words: The Personal in Gender, Culture and Psychotherapy. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gordo, A. and De Vos (eds) (2010) Psychologisation Under Scrutiny, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 8, https://discourseunit.com/annual-review/8-2010/
  • Kovel, J. (1981) The Age of Desire: Case Histories of a Radical Psychoanalyst. New York: Pantheon.
  • Kovel, J. (1983) Against the State of Nuclear Terror. London: Pan.
  • Kovel, J. (1988) The Radical Spirit: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Society. London: Free Association Books.
  • Madsen, O. J. (2014) The Therapeutic Turn: How Psychology Altered Western Culture. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Millet, K. (1977) Sexual Politics. London: Virago.
  • Mitchell, J. (1974) Psychoanalysis and Feminism, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
  • O’Connor, N. and Ryan, J. (1993) Wild Desires and Mistaken Identities: Lesbianism and Psychoanalysis. London: Virago.
  • Owens, C. (ed.) (2009) Lacan and Critical Psychology, Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 7, https://discourseunit.com/annual-review/7-2009/
  • Parker, I. (2004) Slavoj Žižek: A Critical Introduction. London: Pluto Press.
  • Parker, I. (2008) Japan in Analysis: Cultures of the Unconscious. London: Palgrave.
  • Parker, I. (2011) Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Revolutions in Subjectivity. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. and Pavón-Cuéllar, D. (eds) (2014) Lacan, Discourse, Event: New Psychoanalytic Approaches to Textual Indeterminacy. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Psychoanalysis: Psychosocial studies and beyond. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After the Unconscious: From Freud to Lacan. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.
  • Parker, I. (2015) Psychology After Lacan: Connecting the clinic and research. Abingdon/New York: Routledge.


The lecturer
Ian Parker is Honorary Professorial Research Fellow in the Manchester Institute of Education at the University of Manchester, UK. He is a practising psychoanalyst, and is currently President of the College of Psychoanalysts - UK. He is Secretary of Manchester Psychoanalytic Matrix. He is Emeritus Professor of Management at the University of Leicester, and has visiting professorial posts in Belgium, Brazil, South Africa, Spain and the UK. His research and writing has been in the field of psychoanalysis, psychology and social theory, with a particular focus on discourse, critical psychology, mental health and political practice. He is Managing Editor of the Annual Review of Critical Psychology. He is a Fellow of the BPS and the RSA.

His research and writing has been in the field of psychoanalysis, psychology and social theory, with a particular focus on discourse, critical psychology, mental health and political practice. These fields of work each bear on how subjectivity is formed and managed in contemporary culture, and on the way organisational forms reproduce social relationships. He was co-founder, and he is currently co-director (with Professor Erica Burman), of the Discourse Unit (www.discourseunit.com), and details of his publications in different languages can be found at his personal website at www.parkerian.com


Contact
Questions about this PhD course and the application procedures may be directed to Senior Executive Officer Tron Harald Torneby.

Tags: Social Psychology, Critical Psychology, Social and Political Theory, Summer School, PhD, Psychoanalysis
Published Dec. 20, 2017 8:44 AM - Last modified Dec. 20, 2017 11:08 AM