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Mosque in Buenos Aires
Published July 9, 2015 1:06 AM

“In Europe, we too quickly link the idea of converting to Islam with radicalization. Such discourses are much less common here. There is much less fear of Islam than in many European countries,” says Tiffany Linn Utvær Gasser, currently on fieldwork in Buenos Aires.

Published July 7, 2015 12:10 PM

More temporary contracts, more flexible positions, and many people without paid jobs at all. The way we think about labour can be about to change, according to anthropologists.

Published June 29, 2015 8:30 AM

The Oslo-based Research Group for Lifespan Changes in Brain and Cognition has been named as a world-class research group. At the same time the group’s founders, Anders Fjell and Kristine Walhovd, have just received the Research Prize for 2015 awarded by the University of Oslo.

Published June 24, 2015 11:12 AM

Wim van Daele is in Sri Lanka, and has been using Ayurvedic learning to understand how a complex interplay of hot foods, stress, fertilizers, inactivity, changed temporalities, and acceleration of life is leading to gastritis and other digestive problems - in short, an Overheating of the human body.

Published June 23, 2015 3:35 PM

There is a waste of resources in forming academics, having them compete for positions, publications and research funding, that is arguably not efficient, according to Tatiana Fumasoli.

Published June 22, 2015 2:36 PM

What options are available for the Brits should they decide to leave the European Union? Some important lessons can be drawn from Norway, Switzerland and Iceland, current non-members which enjoy the benefits of the EU’s internal market.

Published June 19, 2015 12:17 PM

The Norwegian European policy is characterized by form rather than by content, a new study indicates. An ‘active’ European policy is primarily about a more efficient use of instruments and internal administrative coordination. It is only exceptionally about promoting Norwegian interests in specific policies.

People with the serotonin gene variant have a higher risk than others for developing a depression, when faced with stressful life circumstances. Photo illustration: Colourbox
Published June 15, 2015 8:30 AM

People born with a particular gene variant have a greater risk of developing depressions, a recent study from the Department of Psychology shows.

Published May 22, 2015 7:09 PM

​Coal for power, iron ore for steel girders, minerals for our smart phones: the mining business is booming. More and more anthropologists are uncovering effects of this development that would otherwise risk falling under the radar.

Factory with pipes and steam
Published May 18, 2015 12:28 PM

Pessimism prevails about the future of carbon capture and storage in both the USA and EU. This is despite the fine promises that it was precisely this technology that would save the oil and gas industry.

Iceland has cheap and environmentally friendly power because the volcanic activity that formed the island 50 million years ago still provides an important natural resource. Photo: Gunnuhver geothermal area, by Carsten ten Brink, flickr
Published May 13, 2015 4:59 PM

Why has Iceland, a country that is famous for its abundant renewable energy, started to engage in oil exploitation? Other countries are moving away from fossil fuels. Why is this volcanic island choosing the opposite path and will it be worth it, master student Pernille Ihme wonders, currently on fieldwork in northeastern Iceland.

Instead of focusing on stopping crimes in progress, patrols will be able to be there before it happens, and thus hopefully prevent the crime from occurring at all.
Published Apr. 24, 2015 1:55 PM

Did you think Big Data was just a buzzword? American researchers have developed algorithms for predicting crime before it happens.

How do borders affect people's lives? Photo: Sara Prestianni, Noborders Network, flickr
Published Apr. 24, 2015 3:26 AM

News about sinking boats carrying African migrants as they attempt to reach Europe is shaking the public. Similar dramas are unfolding regularly in Melilla, where Gard Ringen Høibjerg is currently on fieldwork.

Published Apr. 7, 2015 8:15 PM

Economic crises can lead to a rise in xenophobia. But the opposite can also be true. At the next Overheating seminar, anthropologist Theodoros Rakopoulos will talk about the thriving solidarity economy in Greece.

Published Mar. 29, 2015 3:26 AM

Instead of reviewing laws and policies in their offices, bureaucrats tour the country, hold public meetings and communicate with citizens via social media. An initiative in Tanzania can serve as example for other countries wishing to revive local democracy and expand their political and legal repertoire, believes anthropologist Knut Christian Myhre, who is currently writing a book on the topic.

Published Mar. 24, 2015 1:01 PM

A newborn infant can see its parents' expressions at a distance of 30 cm. For the first time researchers have managed to reconstruct infants visual perception of the world.

Published Mar. 22, 2015 2:32 PM

Would you like to influence policies on climate change, oil drilling, war, and peace? More and more corporations and foreign governments are convinced that creating a think tank is the way to go. But the power of think tanks is more fragile than is generally assumed, as anthropologist Christina Garsten learned during her fieldwork.

Why all those dying fish? Because of a recent flooding or industrial activities? Photo: Greens MPs, flickr
Published Mar. 9, 2015 4:30 PM

"Who pays for your research? Who benefits from a particular version of reality? These questions should be raised time and again to get a better vantage-point for acting upon an overheated world,” says Thomas Hylland Eriksen after having studied an environmental scandal in Australia.

Published Feb. 24, 2015 9:32 AM

Thomas Hylland Eriksen and Henrik Sinding-Larsen from Overheating have received funding from the Norwegian Research Council to organise a conference on sustainability.

Published Feb. 19, 2015 9:02 AM

Zdenka Sokolíčková Ph.D. M.A. from the Czech Republic will be on a research stay at the Department of Social Anthropology, from 23 February – 8 March 2015.​

Published Feb. 13, 2015 10:27 AM

How does global capitalism influence our relations with other people and our perceptions of who we are? How do people cope with rapid changes in their surroundings? Which roles can researchers play in times of change and conflict?

Published Feb. 13, 2015 9:34 AM

A Superman cartoon was able to bring some movement to the polarized immigration debate. What can social scientists learn from this?

Published Feb. 12, 2015 3:02 PM

The EU system has changed significantly as a result of the euro crisis. A large international conference in Oslo in November discussed the democratic implications of these changes, both for the EU and Norway.

Published Feb. 12, 2015 11:16 AM

Christopher Lord and John Erik Fossum contribute to PADEMIA's weblectures on parliamentary democracy, which are now available online.

Published Jan. 27, 2015 3:10 PM

Tatiana Fumasoli explains how academic career structures are changing in Europe in an interview with Times Higher Education.