Parliament Staff

A new study of European Parliament staff published in Journal of European Public Policy finds that political group staff are primarily committed to the concerns of their respective political groups, but also to the arguments of those external actors which have similar party affiliation.

The European Parliament (Photo: EP)

Morten Egeberg, Åse Gornitzka, Jarle Trondal and Mathias Johannessen have published the article 'Parliament Staff: Unpacking the Behaviour of Officials in the European Parliament' in Journal of European Public Policy.

Abstract

Officials within parliaments have received marginal scholarly attention. This also holds for the European Parliament (EP) which contains a considerable administration. This study, based on an online survey (N = 118), shows that political group staff are primarily committed to the concerns of their respective political groups, but also to the arguments of those external actors which have similar party affiliation.

Since most group officials are, in addition, affiliated to a particular committee, they also emphasize sectoral interests, including the concerns of affected interest groups. EP secretariat officials, on the other hand, give priority to sectoral and expert concerns. Both groups of staff rank European concerns above national ones, and pay more attention to the arguments of the European Commission than to the arguments of any other institution.

This study thus suggests that officials in the EP contribute to the spanning of ideological and sectoral cleavages across European Union institutions. These observations may be seen as deviating from a basically intergovernmental portrayal of the Union.

Full info

Morten Egeberg, Åse Gornitzka, Jarle Trondal and Mathias Johannessen
'Parliament Staff: Unpacking the Behaviour of Officials in the European Parliament'

Journal of European Public Policy

Vol. 20, no. 4, 2013, pp. 495-514
DOI: 10.1080/13501763.2012.718885

 

Published May 30, 2013 2:38 PM - Last modified May 12, 2014 11:20 AM