The EU and the implementation of international law: the case of ‘sea-level bureaucrats’

Christer Gulbrandsen has published the article "The EU and the implementation of international law: the case of ‘sea-level bureaucrats’" in Journal of European Public Policy Vol. 18 No. 7.

Journal of European Public Policy 18(7)

Abstract

Is the European Union (EU) influencing national bureaucracies' implementation of international law? This paper reports findings from interviews with ship inspectors and their superiors about European training aimed at harmonization. The maritime sector's highly institutionalized global regime may constitute an unlikely case for European influence over national bureaucrats for historical, institutional and economic reasons.

This examination of ‘sea-level bureaucrats’ shows how European executive capacity is acquired at the national level even in this sector, adding to our insights on implementation and compliance in European governance. We find evidence that inspections seem Europeanized, and together with research on other sectors, this indicates the development of a new, international, multi-level administrative order with stronger traits of direct implementation. In it, the EU may have developed into an interpretative filter for national implementation of global maritime safety rules.

More info

"The EU and the implementation of international law: the case of ‘sea-level bureaucrats’"

Christer Gulbrandsen

Journal of European Public Policy
Volume 18, Issue 7, 2011
Pages 1034-1051
DOI: 10.1080/13501763.2011.599974

Published Sep. 15, 2011 3:03 PM - Last modified Oct. 17, 2011 1:56 PM